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Full text of "The Sapphire"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sapphireOOfass_0 



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BEMSOM 

PRINTING COMPANY 





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IBRARY 




||g^y|OU have in the "Sap- 
phire" of 1 92 1 the ardent 
labours of the editors, 
= who, like the "poor be- 
nighted Hindoo, do the best they 
kin do." Judge us kindly, for our 
aim, whatever our faults may be, 
has been to produce an Annual that 
will help you to recall, with pleasure, 
the faces, the places, and the events 
of a happy school year. 





MISS WITHERSPOON and MISS WEISS 



Who, by their co-operation and in- 
terest, have made the success of this 
Annual possible, and who represent 
to us "Ideals of Faculty School 
Spirit," we lovingly and grate- 
fully dedicate the "Sapphire" 
of Nineteen Twenty-one. 



iwft 



ORDER, 



2f 



DEPART 
MENT>y 



FACULTY CLUBS 
SCHOOL ATriLETiCSl 
CLASSES STUHTC 
ITHEAKtt OOUFKEffl); 





' Page eight 



Faculty 



Miss Kate C. Shipp, Principal 

Teachers' Diploma, Cambridge University, England. 

MRS. Anna McBee, Assistant Principal 

Miss Elizabeth Louise Steinbrenner, A.M. 

Lalin 
Diploma Parker Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y.; B.S. and A.M. Columbia University. 

Miss Helen Louise Abbott, B.A. 

Mathematics 
Smith College 

Miss Jean Witherspoon, A.M. 

English 
A.B. and A.M. University of South Carolina 

Miss Letitia T. E. Ricaud, A.M. 

History 
A.B. Goucher College; Student University of Pennsylvania; Johns Hopkins University. 

Miss M. Louise Buckner 

Librarian; Assistant in English and History 
Hollins College. 

Mrs. Bruce Drysdale 

Physiology, Botany, General Science, and Intermediate W or\ 
Graduate Philadelphia Normal School. 

Miss Louise de Blanc 

French; Gymnastics 
Student Tulane University and Newcomb College. 

Mr. Wm. Gaspard de Coligny, B.A., B.L. 

French ; Spanish 
B.L. University of France; College of Charlemagne, Paris; B.A. Central University of Toledo, Spain. 

Miss Martha Dowd 

Director of Music; Piano; Theory; History of Music 

Graduate St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. ; Pupil August Kuersteimer, Sophus Wiig, Albert Mack, Edwin 

Farmer; Student in Theory and Pedagogy of Clarence G. Hamilton, of Wellesley. 

Miss Margaret Butman 

Assistant Director ; Piano 
Graduate New England Conservatory of Music 

Miss Gizella R. Weiss, B.A., B. Design 

Art; Dramatic Art 
Newcomb College; Tulane University. 

Miss Emelyn Huff, B.L.I. 

Expression ; Dramatic Art; Supervisor of Athletics 
Emerson College of Oratory. 

Miss Mary Thrall 

Domestc Science 
Graduate Framming, Massachusetts, Normal School 

Miss M. H. Sampson 

Domestic Art; Supervisor of Health 
Certificate from College of Preceptors, London, England. 

Miss Jenny Fleetwood Westfeldt 

Secretary and Bursar 

Miss Evelyn Byrd Graham 

Chaperon 



Page 




Annual Staff 

Nancy Battle Editor-in-Chief 

Annette Wright .... Business Manager 

ELIZABETH HlCKERSON Assistant Editor-in-Chief 





Staff 






Van Landingham 




Call ' ', 


Montgomery 


Rice 


Myers 


McMillan 


Ross 


Gentry 


M. Wads worth 


West 


Grimes 


E. Shelton 


Raney 


Birdsey 




Tucker 


Douglass 




Roberts 


MlDDLETON 




Russell 



Page ten 



Fassifern, 1907-1921 

1»W| -flfi ASSIFERN opened its doors to students October 7, 1907, completing, therefore, with 

V-'vM-vrO' this term, its fourteenth session. The name, chosen several years before the foundation 

of the school, was bestowed in honor of one of the Cameron homes in the highlands 

of Scotland. This charming region, in the neighborhood of Loch Eil, is intimately 

||fi^_^3\S]J associated with the romantic adventures of Prince Charles Edward and the Rebellion 

of the '45. The night before he was joined by the clans at Glenfinnan, the prince 

was the guest of Cameron of Fassifern, brother of' the gentle Sir Ewen, chief of the Clan Cameron. 

Fassifern is a Gaelic word, meaning "House among the alders. 

The founder of the school while a teacher in a large boarding school no'iced that many very young 
girls were brought there who needed more individual attention than could be given them in a large 
school. She conceived the idea of establishing a school so limited in numbers that each girl might 
receive the particular teaching, care, and attention her case demanded. 

Lincolnton, North Carolina, was selected as a suitable and conveniently located town; and a hillside 
overlooking the river was the chosen site of the home school. 

When the opening day arrived the buildings were not ready, so the school was really begun in a 
house belonging to Mr. Reinhardt, on the main street of the village. Here arrived, October 7, seven 
boarding pupils: Eva Moody, Jane Meares, Mildred Jenkins, Nell O'Kelly, Lesa Royall, Lorena 
Wiseman, Jannie Wetmore. At Thanksgiving the house on the hill was ready, and by that time the 
number of boarding pupils had increased to thirteen, known as "the original thirteen." 

During the first year there were fifteen resident students, the number selected for the ideal school. 
There were thirty-one students in all, including three "co-eds." These three were, or to be exact, now 
are Capt. W. E. Shipp, U. S. A., graduate of West Point; Lieut. James Abernethy, who won his 
military title in the World War; and Dr. David Rudisill. 

The faculty at that time included the present principals and Miss Josephine Bcwen, teacher of music. 
It soon became evident that with the demands of a school for girls it was necessary to employ other 
teachers; so more students were received. The second year twenty-two bearding pupils matriculated 
at Fassifern, and a cottage was bought for their accommodation. Later two buildings were added, and 
there was room enough for forty resident students. Sarah Williams of Greenville, S. C. (Mrs. Denis 
Ryan of Massachusetts) was the last of the original thirteen to leave, having remained at the school five 
years. The "oldest inhabitant" was Mary Damron, who remained seven years as a student, leaving 
in 1916. 

Fassif ern's first graduate and certificate student in music was Anne Pegram Oates, 1913 (now Mrs. 
Henry Ashley of California), who, after completing the four years' course, remained two years as a 
student in music. Evelyn Byrd Graham, who entered as a student in 1909, is still at Fassifern 
as chaperon. 

The Class of 1914 graduated only one student, Jennie Saine, who was also a music certificate pupil. 
She remained a year longer as special student. 

Nineteen hundred fifteen sent out six graduates in full course, Katherine Manning and Lucy Murchi- 
son, both of Wilmington, carrying off first and second honors. Miss Manning entered Goucher College 
on certificate from Fassifern, graduated there with distinction, and is now teaching in Washington, D. C. 
A brilliant pair of sisters, Sarah and Eleanor McLoud, of Asheville, the latter a graduate of 1915, 
entered Lake Erie College, Ohio, and completed the course there with honors. Caroline Hough was 
admitted on certificate to the University of Florida. 

In 1916 Fassifern was accredited by Smith and Wellesley colleges. Almost since the formation of 
the Southern Association of Colleges it has been on that accredited list. 

In 1914 it was decided to move the school to Hendersonville, N. C. On the anniversary of the 
first opening Fassifern received into its new home sixty boarding pupils, thirty-four of whom were former 
students. There were twenty day pupils from the town of Hendersonville. ' 

In the course of years departments have been added, with instructors for the same. In 1915 the 



Page eleven 



course in Spanish was begun, and in 1916 the departments of Domestic Science and Domestic Art 
were established. Under the present instructor, Miss Weiss, the Art Department has taken on new life. 
Instruction in Spoken English, or Expression, was begun in 1920 under M:ss Huff and Miss Weiss. 

The graduating class of 1916 had only four members. Jessie Jenkins won first honor, and Louise 
Hodges (Mrs. N. F. Jones of South Carolina), second. 

The 1917 graduates were eight in number, with Miriam McCIammy and Mary Cobb as first and 
second honor students. Mary Cobb had the distinction of being the first girl admitted to the Freshman 
Class of the University of North Carolina. She has continued the course, and is now a member of 
the Senior Class. 

Nineteen hundred eighteen had one more graduate than the previous year; the first and second honor 
members were Jean Robertson and Ella Tew Lindsay, the latter having taken the whole High School 
Course at Fassifern. 

In 1919 there were twenty-six who received diplomas. This year presented the problem of two 
seniors who had exactly the same average; so there were two valedictorians — Virginia Ryder and Alma 
Seagle. One delivered her farewell message in English and the other in Latin. Jane Guignard had 
second honor. 

Nineteen students graduated in 1920, with Deane Van Landingham and Annie Chadbourne leading. 

There are about forty members of the Class of 1921. 

When Fassifern School was moved to Hendersonville there were two buildings containing all the 
rooms necessary for sixty resident students. In 1920 a new dormitory, McBee Hall, was erected. This 
building has been used for seniors, and twenty-five have been housed there during the present school 
year. A houee has been rented as a home for teachers, thus allowing more space for students, who at 
this time number one hundred and seven, just one hundred more than the group who appeared on 
October 7, 1907. 

For lack of room Fassifern was obliged to decline, during the past year, almost as many as it 
accepted. 

The faculty now consisls of sixteen teachers. All instructors in the Academic Department have 
college degrees. The following universities and colleges are represented by iheir alumni: France, Toledo, 
Cambridge, Columbia, Tulane, South Carolina, Smith, Goucher, Newcomb. 

Mrs. Drysdale, teacher of the intermediate department, is a graduate of the Philadelphia Normal 
School; Miss Thrall, Domestic Science, of the Framingham, Mass., Normal; Miss Huff, Expression, 
Emerson College of Oralory. 

Miss Dowd, a great addition to the life of Fassifern has been Director of Music at St. Mary's, 
Raleigh, and for many years a beloved teacher there. Her assistant. Miss Butman, is a graduate of the 
New England Conservatory. 

So in every department Fassifern has sought ihe best instructors. Her daughters have been accepted 
on certificate by Smith, Goucher, Lake Erie, Universities of North Carolina and Florida, and by most 
of the Southern colleges. Many are still in college; many are married; several are business women or 
teachers. It is hoped that all are useful as well as happy women. 

Fassifern took an active part in the work for the soldiers during the World War, and has kept its 
100 per cent membership in the Red Cross. In 1918-19 the contributions through the Red Cross were 
cash $191, garments 110. To Committee for Devastated France and Permanent Blind Fund, $200. In 
1919-20 through the Red Cross to European Relief Fund, $150; to tubercular patients, Hendersonville, 
$50. During the present term $150 has been contributed, through the Red Cross, to European Relief 
Fund, and $47 to the same through Mr. Page. Also $42 to the Chinese Relief. A good deal more 
will be sent to the relief fund before the close of the session. 

The school has aided students or supported scholarships at Valle Crucis; Christ School, Arden; 
Franklin Presbyterian School; Salisbury Industrial School; Balfour Orphanage; Thompson Orphanage; 
and other institutions. KaTHERINE Cameron SHtPP. 



Page twelve 




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OUR FACULTY MEMBER 
Guide, Counselor, Friend 



Officers 

Nancy Battle President 

Annette Wright Vice-President 

Gertrude Wadsworth Secretary-Treasurer 

Margaret Raney Class Editor on Sapphire Staff 

Margaret and Gertrude Wadsworth Historians 

Nora Seaver Poet 

Betty Myers Prophet 



Page fourteen 



>enior 



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Nancy Ashe Battle 

CHAPEL HII.L, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidc le for Diploma 

General Council '19 '20, '20-'21; Best Leader of 
Girls '20-'21; Editor-in-Chief of Sapphire '20-'21; 
Assistant Editor of Special '19-'20; Most Attractive 
'19-'20, '20-'21; President Dramatic Club '20-'21; 
Domestic Art Certificate; Senior President; Glee 
Club '19-'20, '20-'21; Grandchildren's Club; Winner 
of General Excellence Medal '19-'20; Tennis Club 
'19-'20, r 20-"21; Cheer Leader '19-'20, '20-'21; 
T. K. S. 

Don't be alarmed at Nancy's long string of honors, 
she has twice as long a list of friends. Perhaps she 
was predestined to be our senior president, anyway 
we know she has made the best president a class ever 
had. Being the mo;t attractive and the best leader of 
girls has not turned her curly h?ad at all — and is she 
clever? Well, she's editor of this Annual. Judge 
for yourself. 

"In her we see Honor, Truth, and Loyalty." 



Mary Lamar Birdsey 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 
Candidate fir Diploma 

Lavendar Leader '20-'21 ; Tennis Club '19-'21; Rid- 
ing Club '20-'21; Sub. Team '19-'21; General Coun- 
cil '19-'20; Junior Councilor '19-'20; Cotillion Club; 
Property Manager Dramatic Club '20-'21; Most Ath- 
letic 'ly-'20, '20-'21; D. C. '19-'20; Captain Senior 
Team; Athletic Editor of Sapphire '19-'20; Athletic 
Editor of "Special" '19-'20; Advertising Editor of 
Sapphire '20-'21; T. K. S. 

Though small in stature "Bird" is certainly a chirper, 
whose argumentative note rings clear and true about 
twenty-lhree and a half hours out of the twenty-four. 
Her favorite topics of discussion are Hawaii, Wild 
Girls I Have Known, and Speed. However, you 
mustn't think she is merely a talker; far from it. 
Just look at her success as Lavender Leader and 
as Advertising Manager; you'll find in her case "Ac- 
tions speak as loud as words." 

"/'// argue until from my bones my flesh is hacked." 



Adeline Josephine Bisbee 

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 

Adeline look the city of Hendersonville quite by sur- 
prise when she arrived from the town of Jacksonville. 
It is rumored that there is not a boy here who at one 
time or another has not been subject to her charms. 
And O, how she can "Cat Walk!" 

"She is a dancer, with nimble feet." 




Page fifteen 




>enior 



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Anne Livingston Borden 

GOLDSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Glee Club '19-'20, '20-'21; Dramatic Club '19-'20 
General Council '20-'21; Methodist Treasurer '20-'21 
Domestic Art Certificate; Cotillion Club '20-'21 
W. A. W. 

Though considered quiet by those who do not really 
know her, Anne is certainly "quite the stuff" to her 
intimate friends, of whom she boasts a wide circle 
The Glee Club couldn't get along without her alto, 
and Senior Hall thinks she is indispensable because 
she's not afraid of Rats. 

"How now! A rat? 
Not a mouse stirring." 



Madeline Call 

WILKESBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

General Council '20-'21; Glee Club '19-'20, '20-'21; 
Tennis Club '19-'20, '20-'21; Leader of Cotillion 
'20-'21; Mandolin-Guitar Club '20-'21; Most Musical 
'19-'20, '20-'21; Music Editor of Sapphire; Music 
Certificate; W. A. W. 

Madeline is a true pianist. She can play anything 
from Margie to Mendelssohn's March, though we 
believe she prefers the latter. She is quite partial 
to Winston-Salem, but we are unable to decide the 
exact reason for this. Madeline is a good sport, and 
the number of people always listening to hear Made- 
line Call shows her immense popularity. 

"And let her ply her music." 



Lucy Neal Carr 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Cotillion Club; Guilford County Club; Daintiest; 
W. A. W. 

To look at "Tuce" you see she is both little and 
dainty, but you couldn't guess what a keen sense of 
humor she has and the funny things she does say. 
Many a time has McBee Hall been waked from its 
slumbers by Tuce's roommate's loud laughter upon 
suddenly seeing the point to her last joke, which is 
sometimes rather deep. 

"My word, such humor." 



Page sixteen 



Senior Class 



Marjorie Louise Carson 

HENDERSONV1LLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

She excels in pep, good nature, and good dancing. 
"Margie" is just the girl to have around all the time. 
But the one thing that binds her to our hearts is her 
effervescent humor which is always bubbling over. 

"You laugh, you leap, and you say you are merry." 



Helen Mai Conroy 

CULLOWHEE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Senior Team; Glee Club; Music Club; Western Caro- 
lina Club. 

On one brisk September morning as everything was 
more quiet than usual came boisterous (?) "Cony!" 
She blew in from the wilds of Cullowhee. "Cony" 
is very musical and we believe in the near future we 
shall hear of her as a second Farrar or mayhap an- 
other Galli-Curci. 

"Stay, speal( — spea\, I charge thee, spea\." 



Our "House Mother" 



"Our Home" 




Page seventeen 




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Eloise Gettys 

JEFFERSONVILLE, GEORGIA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Baptist Treasurer; Domestic Science Certificate; 
Music Club; Georgia-Florida Club; R. O. S. W. 

"Everything is peaches down in Georgia"; we heard 
this about five years ago. Beg pardon! it still holds 
good since "Loise" has blossomed in our midst. She 
spends most of her time writing to the Admiral and 
reading his latest reports of Jefferson' llle. A person 
as generous and sweet as "Losie" is hard to find. 
Really, the Harmony class could not possibly exist 
without her. 

"This is the very ecstasy of love." 



Edna Louise Glenn 

ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Music Club; Golden Fleece; Glee Club; Cotillion 
Club; Dramatic Club; Tennis Club; Western Caro- 
lina Club. 

Louise is our professional entertainer, with her ghost 
stories and wonderful dancing. Besides this she is 
a great fortune teller, and we hope she will foretell 
happy futures for us all; she is "right there" when it 
comes to school parties. Louise is very musical, and 
withal, a geometry shark. 

"I could a tale unfold, whose lightest word would 
harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood." 



Anabel Goodwin 

HENDERSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Her sweet disposition makes for her many friends to 
whom her silence and indifference are often the 
causes of great distress. She is not excitable as a 
rule, but oh, let someone mention a Blue Ridge ball 
game, or the West! 

"The silence often of pure innocence persuades, when 
speaking fails." 



Page eight 



Senior Class 



Jane McBee Grimes 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 
Candidate for Diploma 

General Council '19-'20, '20-'21; Grandchildren's 
Club; Tennis Club '20-'21; Riding Club '20-'21; D. 
C. '19-'21; Assistant Literary Editor of Sapphire 
'21; Domestic Science Certificate; T. K. S. 

Always merry, Jane's melodious (?) voice and gentle 
(?) laughter can be heard resound.ng through McBee 
Hall, and sh-h — don't mention it — some of the 
echoes must have reached the corner room in Cam- 
eron Hall. Somelhing has certainly stirred the hearls 
of the fair maidens there so far as "Miss Grimes" 
is concerned. Somehow we can't blame the smitten 
ones, for Jane's heart is as big as her disposition is 
sunny. 

"Alas, siveel lady, rvhai imports this song?" 



Lida Rodman Guion 

NEW BERN, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Domestic Art Certificate; Domestic Science Certifi- 
cate; Most Dignified '19-'20. 

How often in beseeching tones have we quoted to 
Lida the "sentiment" found at the end of these "re- 
marks!" For those who know her best realize that 
underneath her quiet dignity she hides a keen sense 
of humor and a vast store of dry wit. Never in a 
flurry or buslle, always serenely calm and well poised, 
she carries the title "senior" quite fittingly. 

"Be not a niggard of your speech." 



Annie' Elizabeth Hickerson 

RONDA, NORTH CAROLINA 
Candidate for Diploma 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief of Sapphire '21; Tennis 
Club '19-'20, '20-'21; Grandchildren's Club; Music 
Club '20-'21; Jump Off. 

Although Lib spends most of her time poring over 
school books, we all agree that she is a good sport. 
In tennis she is a match for anyone. "Once a 
friend, always a friend," seems to be her motto. 

"Thou art a scholar." 




Page nineteen 




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Anna Norwood Lawrence 

LUMBERTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Domestic Science Certificate; Glee Club; Cotillion 
Club; Music Club; W. A. W. 

McBee Hall has been a different place since Anna 
decided lo slay with us; not only has it been happier 
but also much noisier as Anna just must talk all the 
time. Nevertheless, we have to forgive her and listen 
with both ears to hear the "latest." And truly, we 
are all ears when Anna sings, for her voice is the 
"best ever." 

"Har\, she speaks, it is an unaccustomed action 
with her." 



Sara Jane Lesley 

TAMPA, FLORIDA 

Domestic Science Certificate; Dramatic Club; Riding 
Club; Tennis Club; Georgia-Florida Club; Most 
Graceful; W. A. W. 

Speaking of charmers, there is one in school this 
year. Sara draws the masculine sex as a magnet at- 
tracts sleel. With grace and charm, what more could 
one ask of the gods? 

"She is a charmer." 



Mary Bridgman Little 

WASHINTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Jump Off; Tennis Club. 

No, there is no cause for alarm, that is only 
"Bridgy" trying to sing! At any hour of the day 
her shrill contralto (?) may be heard in McBee Hall. 
But though she wi'.l sing and borrow, "Bridgy" has 
a generous heart and a cheery smile which will al- 
ways win for her friends wherever she goes. 

"Neither 



borrower nor a lender 



Page 



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Winnie Vera Mauney 

KINGS MOUNTAIN, NORTH CAROLINA 
Candidate for Diploma 

Senior Basketball Team; Music Club; Jump Off; 
Glee Club; Dramatic Club. 

Winnie Vera comes from the historic town of 
Kings Mountain ; maybe that accounts for her bril- 
liancy in history class. But we cannot account for 
her being such a "child prodigy" in basketball. In- 
deed, the senior team would lose its wonderful "rep" 
if it were not for "Mooney." 

"New honors come upon ihee." 



Edwina McMillan 

HENDERSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Assistant Business Editor of Sapphire. 

Dainty Edwina, 

Prelly and petite, 

A graceful dancer; 

And, oh, so sweet. 

Ready to go any time you say 

To a game or a dance at C. M. N. A. 

"A graceful dancer she!" 



Jo Haywood McMillan 

HENDERSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

We seldom see Jo, for as soon as school is over she 
runs ! But we know that in geometry we couldn't do 
without her, especially when it comes to "originals!" 
C. M. N. A. has a special a'traciion for Jo, except 
on Sunday afternoons when she is perfectly content 
to stay at home in the swing. We can't think why — . 

"Merrily, merrily shall I live noiv !" 




Page iTuenty-one 



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Senior CI 



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Margaret Middleton 

HENDERSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 
Candidate for Diploma 

General Council '20-'21; Assistant Advertising 
Editor. 

Though she may appear quiet, that is merely dignity, 
for when we see her in French class she is, well — 
rather the opposite. The best thing we can wish for 
any school is that all its day pupils prove as nice 
as Margaret. The poet surely summed up our feel- 
ings when he said: 

"Not too grave, not loo gay, but just a jolly good 
fellow." 



Erma Morris 

HENDERSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma , 

Erma's small, but she gets there. There's no busier 
bee than Erma when she's once started, and she ob- 
tains results, too. In brains and ability Erma regis- 
ters A N . So why not be small! 

"/ idle not atoay my lime." 



Betty Lacy Myers 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 
Candidate for Diploma 

Chairman of General Council (2) '20-'21; Secretary 
and Treasurer of Dramatic Club '20-'21; "Sweetest" 
'20-'21; Most Popular '20-'21; Literary Editor of 
Sapphire '20-'21; Guilford County Club; T. K. S. 

Have you ever thought so much of a person that you 
couldn't half express what you would like to say? 
That's the way we feel in regard to our "Most Pop- 
ular" and "Sweetest" Betty. You mustn't tell her 
so, but she is our Ideal Senior, one who abounds in 
"School Spirit, ' lovableness, and fun. 

"To £non> her is to love her." 



Page Ivenly-lwo 



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Rebecca Lucile Sherrod 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Glee Club: Cotillion Club; Music Club; W. A. W. 

Lucile is the beauty of the Class of '21. Does she 
deserve to be? Just look at her picture. The old 
saying, 'Pretty is as pretty does," surely applies to 
her in more ways than one, for she cerlainly is one 
of the sweetest and most attractive w; know. 

"Lo, \)ou, here she comes, observe her, stand close." 



Mary Thorpe Smith 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Junior Counselor (1) '19-'20; Sweetest '19-'20; Mar- 
shal '19-'20; Tennis Club '19-'20 '20-'21; W. A. W. 

You just cannot make M. T. mad; try as you will, 
she is always, smiling, and she is as good looking as 
she is good natured. Sometimes we wonder how 
such a lazy person can make such a wonderful tennis 
player, but she surely "makes a hit" when it comes to 
tennis. 

"Thou will not be angry." 



Mae Katherine Swink 

WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA 
Candidcte for Diploma 

Domestic Science Certificate; Most Stylish '20-'21; 
W. A. W. 

"Mae Kit" has quite a crowd of admirers, commonly 
known as the menagerie, on account of their queer 
names. "Mae Kit" is the most stylish girl in the 
school, but with her it is not a case of "fine feathers 
make fine birds" because even in calico rags she 
would be the same fine "Mae Kit." 

"And lool( hoiv tvell ml) garments sit upon me." 




Page ln>eni))-five 




Senior Class 



Emma Randolph Thompson 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Glee Club; Dramatic Club; Music Club. 

We have certainly enjoyed Emma during the three 
quarters she has been with us. She is so full of fun 
and humor we don't understand how we stood the 
first quarter of school without her. Whenever you 
see Emma she wants to know your hobby and your 
idea of misery — we wonder why? 

"/ wish you all the joy thai one can wish." 



Emily Bruce Thornley 

PICKENS, SOUTH CAROLINA 
Candidate for Diploma 

South Carolina Club '20-'21. 

Emily has two failings that we know. She gets a 
package every day and she will talk of South Caro- 
lina. But if she of the sunny disposition and re- 
nowned generosity is an example of the true South 
Carolinian, we don't mind hearing so much about tne 
Palmetto State after all. 

"Ta\e thy fair hour — time be thine." 



Mary Badham Tucker 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 
Candidate for Diploma 

Assistant Local Editor of Sapphire '20-'21; Class 
Basketball Team '19-'20, '20-'21; Music Club; Tennis 
Club '19-'20, '20-'21; Vice-President South Carolina 
Club; Golden Fleece. 

"Tuck," as she is better known among her school 
friends, is one of our happy-go-lucky Charlestonians. 
Wherever you meet her she is either going home for 
a week-end or a game at C. M. N. A. or, better 
still, to one of those grand old C. M. N. A. dances. 
How "Tuck" gets off so often is a mystery to us, 
but she always has a host of friends to welcome 
her back. 

"What haste? Can you not stay a while?" 



Page Iwenly-six 



Senior CI 



ass 



Gertrude Franklin Wadsworth 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Secretary and Treasurer '17-'18, '1S-'19, '19-'20, 
'20-'21; Vice-President '19-'20; Class Councilor 
'19-'20; General Council '20-'21; Dramatic Club 
'19-'20; Vice-President of Missionary Society '20- 
'21; T. K. S. 

This is one of the twins, but for the life of us we 
can't tell which! If we say that it is gentle, affec- 
tionate Margaret and it should be proud, haughty 
Gerlrude, we will never hear the last of it. So let s 
say this is "Gert," who is always telling jokes with 
Anne or Anna, or sometimes, we shudder to think 
about it, blessing out poor Margaret. But in spite 
of her temper we all know "Gert" is a good sport, 
and her popularity is shown by the fact that during 
the four years she has been up here, she has always 
been a class officer, and a good one, too. 

"The just presentation of two sisters. 



Margaret Franklin Wadsworth 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Art Certificate; Art Editor of Sapphire; Tennis 
Club '19-'20; Basketball Team '20-'21; Class His- 
torian; T. K. S. 

Well, this is the other twin, and as we said the first 
was Gertrude, we are sure that this is Margaret. 
We couldn't get along without Margaret's artistic 
talent. The annual shows the ability of its Art 
Editor. Margaret is the twin who so greatly admires 
"Little Women," or shall we say "A Little Lady?" 
But we know she has many f'riends, and her motto 
seems to be: 

"// / do vote a friendship, I perform it to the last 
article." 



Sara Fenner Walker 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

Candidate for Diploma 

Varsity Team '19-'20; General Council '20-'21; Ten- 
nis Club '20-'21. 

Sarah Fenner hails from Baltimore where they have 
"real" winters and "no rain." She is quite a basket- 
ball player, having made both class and varsity 
teams. During the two years she has been up here 
she has been a "good pal" to us all. 

"/ n>ill anon — tvail until I finish my dinner." 




Page twenty-seven 




Senior Class 



Alice Hill Webb 

HILLSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Domestic Science Certificate; Domestic Art Certifi- 
cate; Best Disposition '19-'20, '20-'21; Jump Off; 
T. K. S. 

"Gyp," although so small, has an opinion of her 
own, which she voices as loud as the loudest of us. 
But the fact that she has the "Best Disposition" in 
school proves that she seldom expresses thi; opinion 
rashly. Her great generosity and cheerful nature 
have won for her many friends everywhere. 

"My little body is alveary of this great world." 



Mary Alice Wilson 

HENDERSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Candidate for Diploma 

Girls they whine, boys repine; winds howl and seas 
roar, but Mary Alice's tongue wags on forever more. 
Through all the ups and downs she is the bright and 
happy one of "ihe bunch" ; without her our days 
would surely be "stale, flat, and unprofitable." 

"But still her tongue ran on, ihe less weight it bore 
with greater ease." 



Josephine Abigail Wing 

PALMER, MASSACHUSETTS 
Candidate for Diploma 

President of Golden Fleece; Dramatic Club; Tennis 
Club. 

"A certain person" used sound judgment when he 
called "Jo" his "Golden Girl"! Not only does she 
shine in regard to her golden hair, but she's a shining 
light in geometry class as well. May her troubles 
throughout life be as light as herself as she gaily 
Irips along. 

"And her sunny locks hang on her temples like a 
golden fleece." 



Page twenty-eight 




Senior CI 



ass 



Annette Lindsay Wright 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 
Candidate for Diploma 

Class Councilor '18-'19; Varsity Team '19-'20; Mar- 
shal '19-'20; Tennis Club '19-'20; Chairman of Gen- 
eral Council (2) '20-'21; General Councilor '20-'21; 
Vice-President Senior Class '20-'21; Business Man- 
ager Sapphire '20-'21; President Missionary Society 
'20-'21; Leader of Whites '20-'21; Glee Club; Best 
Leader in Dancing '20-'21; Dramatic Club '19-'20; 
T. K. S. 

"Me wanla da mon," said Annette as the "Hurdy 
Gurdy Man," and we know she gat it, for being a 
person of winning personality plus a will of her own 
(lo say nothing of Spanish ancestors), she usually 
at;ains the goal for which she stri.es. And speak- 
ing of goals, you ought to see her play basketball! 
She demonstrates her power as a leader not in danc- 
ing only but also in Council affairs. She proved a 
splendid Chairman of the General Council during 
the two quarters she served in that capacity. 

"Where wilt thou lead us, We will follow." 




To Fassif 



assilern 

O Fassifern! G Fassif ern! 
May our hearts always with loyalty burn. 
And we 11 raise together a rousing cheer 
That will echo forever, far and near — 
Fassifern ! 

O Fass.fern! O Fassifern! 
For you in the future we discern 
A iiiche more bright in the hall of fame, 
While joyously we praise your name — 
Fassifern! 

O Fassifern! O Fassifern! 
Though far away we go, to you we return, 
And with hearts that ever beat more true 
In other days we'll come back to you — 
Dear Fassifern! 

Eugenia Brown, '24. 



Ch 



oice 



Spring is such a spoiled thing. 

Every poet sings her praises; 
So when I feel the least inspired, 

I'll sing of Winter in my lays! 

Of Winter's storms and Winter's snows! 

Of shrieking wind and howling blast! 
Of cosy fire and warmth within — 

Without, who cares the storm may last? 

No daffodils will deck my page, 
But roasting apples in the fire; 

No tender smile of gentle Spring, 
Instead — wild call; of Winter's ire! 

Of course I really am no judge, 
My choice may have no reason ; 

And yet I hold in preference 
Winter, the peer of any season! 

Nancy Battle, '21. 



Page twenty-nine 



Senior History 




NE child is bad enough, why bother with two?" If this thought had not 
entered the mind of the Wadsworth twins' mother four years ago, after 
she had spanked one of them twice — thinking she had done her duty to 
both — the History of the Class of 1 92 1 would have begun one year later. 
As it happened, our "Class life" was really "inaugurated" in 1916, 
when Gertrude and Margaret were sent to Fassifern where, thanks to the 
faculty, they were never spanked. 

The second year brought a few more "recruits" to our class and, to pass on briefly, 
we might say that Sophomore knowledge was acquired with little effort on our part. 

In 1919 when we returned to Fassifern as Juniors school life had to be taken more 
seriously. Student Government was tried out and proved to be very successful. The 
Junior-Senior banquet was the chief event of the year. 

Alas! we wonder who could adequately describe the thrill of being "dignified 
Seniors!" Our senior year finds our number increased to forty-two members, many of 
whom are daughters of "Chief Bushy Head." Twenty-six of us "watched over and 
protected" by our good friend, Miss Buckner, live in McBee Hall, a cozy "little home" 
which Miss Kate and Mrs. McBee had built especially for the Seniors. 

Though we've often disturbed our teachers by making so much noise, we have tried 
hard to moderate our "sweet Southern voices" and we leave Fassifern with the hope that 
our career as a class will always remain a pleasant memory to those to whom we now 
say farewell. 



The Seniors Farewell 



We, (he Seniors of "'21," 

Will now have to tell you good-bye. 
We utter these words with a twinge of regret 

As the time for our parting draws nigh. 



Upward we've struggled through many long years, 

Not always doing our best, 
But hoping and trying diplomas to win, 

Until now we have finished our quest. 



We'll worry no longer with Latin and Math, 
Our school days will soon all be done. 

We'll quickly forget our "Disorders" and 
"Words" 
And only remember the fun. 

For we've had a good time at the school we all 
love, 
And we've each made some friends who'll be 
true. 
Though in boarding-school life some hardships 
you'll find, 
We admit ours have been very few. 

So we bid you farewell and pray don't forget 

Our brief, though ambitious past. 
We've had no long motto in Latin or Greek, 

But we tried to B2 to the last. 

Nora Seaver, '21. 



Page thirty 



FAIR FEMALE FREEDOM 

January 19, 1927 



Editor, Prof. Bet Myers, A.B.C.D.E.F. 



DECISION TO BE RENDERED TODAY 

ON PENN-GLENN MURDER CASE 



Juresses Will Pronounce Verdict at 3 XY. 



Today the Final Hearing of the Penn-Glenn Case Will Come Before 

the Court — Miss Middleton, Owner of Middleton's 

Modiste Shop, Reveals Case. 



At yesterday's session the court heard Miss 
Middleton's testimony as follows: 

Miss Glenn left the house at 8 p.m., presum- 
ably to visit Candidate Penn. Middleton states 
that on returning at 12, Glenn pledged her to 
absolute secrecy and related the facts of the even- 
ing. Glenn had entered the house on Easy Street 
at 8:15; during the conversation a hot argument 
ensued. Penn's rapid argument so infuriated her 
op; onent that in a fit of anger Glenn threatened 
to shoot her. A scream, followed by several 
shots, brought the frightened neighbors, who hur- 
riedly summoned the police. As Chief Sherrod 
and his two-hundred-pound assistant, Carr, en- 
tered the room they found Glenn standing with 
a smoking pistol over the dead body of Widow- 
veil's future mayor. Penn's frail secretary, M. T. 
Smith, who had witnessed the murder, fainted 
while being questioned by Carr. 

The murderer escaped and reached home; 
while relating the facts to Middleton, her house 
was surrounded and Glenn captured by the 
police. 

The lawyer for the defense, Birdsey, argued 
long and fervently against the state's representa- 
tive, Raney; but when Judge Lawrence was ap- 
pealed to she left the verdict to the juresses. 



A large crowd is expected to be at the court 
house today. Miss Glenn is very weak after the 
long cross-examination and will be accompanied 
by her doctor, Little, M.D. 



THE NATION'S 

PRESIDENT TO BE 

INAUGURATED 



Miss Battle of Chapel Hill, former head of 
Fassifern, will be inaugurated March the fourth. 
It is supposed that the men's Equal Suffrage Bill 
will be favored by the new Democratic leader. 
She said in one of her campaign speeches that the 
country needs men to embrace the "opportunity" 
(?). The President's rapid speech and unusual 
gesticulations always require great promptness on 
the part of the expert reporters. It is expected 
that Miss Wright, the manager of Miss Battle's 
campaign, will be proposed as Secretary of War ; 
Goodwin as Secretary of the Navy; and Willson, 
M. A., as ambassador to China. The entire per- 
sonnel of the cabinet is as yet undecided. 



Pagz thirty-one 



^®i> 



FAIR FEMALE FREEDOM 



SOCIAL ITEMS 



Widowveil, U. S. A. — Last evening Wabble 
Inn was the scene of a brilliant fancy dress ball 
given by the Anti-Powder League. Walker's 
Ukelele band furnished the music, and joy 
abounded. The wonderfully fashioned costumes 
were designed by Mile. Seaverre. Little Misses 
Conroy and Thompson as moonbeams, in their 
graceful and bewitching dance, the Okra Slide, 
were quite attractive. Mrs. Fauntleroy and Mrs. 
De la Knapsack, formerly Misses Guion and 
Roberts, were conspicuous in their unusual cos- 
tumes as Hawaiian maidens. Delightful refresh- 
men'.s, consisting of cucumbers a la mode and 
peanutarusski, were served. The celebrated 
dancers, Carson and Morris, interpreted Chopin's 
Nocturne on Spring Onions. 

Seventeen cents was cleared, which will go 
to buy hominy for the starving pupils of 
Fassifern. 

The season opens at the Metropo'itan with 
"The Song of the Suds," sung by Miss Jane 
Grimes, the brilliant mezzo-soprano, accom- 
panied by Miss Margaret Wadsworth on the 
piano. 



PERSONALS 



Prof. A. Borden gave a stirring address to the 
students at N. C. College. The subject being 
"Innocence. ' 

N. C. College is delighted over the "pro- 
ficiency" of its new professor, Swink. 



Miss Bisbee, the famous birdologist, who is 
traveling through the South, gave a lecture here 
today on "Birds." 

Mrs. B— (nee Miss Madeline Call) is now at 
Reno suing for a divorce from Mr. B — . The co- 
respondent mentioned in the case is Miss Sara 
Lesley. 

Miss Jo McMillan announces the opening of 
her riding school for young ladies and gents. 
Her sister, Miss Edwina McMillan, now wife of 
Captain F — , has takin up her residence at Fort 
Huggum. 

Mrs. O. By Jingo, formerly Miss Stella Nor- 
man of High Point, has gone to Chapel Hill to 
chaperone the Easter hops. She is the guest of 
President Hickerson and husband. 

Miss Winnie Vera Maun3y, prominent so- 
ciety belle, is in New York, where she will 
christen the new battleship with a Fassifern 
Special. 

A. Webb and J. Russell announce the open- 
ing of the Gyp-Jane haberdashery which is ex- 
pected to rival "Peck and Peck." On the open- 
ing of the Gyp-Jane haberdashery, S. Gettys will 
demonstrate Nelson's Hair Tonic. 

Saturday night G. Wadsworth, detective, broke 
into J. Wing's gambling house in search of the 
governmental money which disappeared from the 
City Hall last week. Miss Wadsworth states 
that while unable to locate the money, she was 
successful in arresting several men who have 
causzd the police force much trouble lately. 

The famous astronomer, Miss Tucker, has cer- 
tainly hitched her wagon lo a star. She has 
opened an observatory on the highest mountain of 
the world, Long John. 



Page ihlrly-two 




Page thirl\)-lhree 



Colors: Purple and Gold 



Juni 



uniors 



Floruer: Phlox 



Mascot : Frances Reynolds 
Miss Weiss Faculty Adviser 



Officers 
first quarter second quarter 

Margaret Davis President Margaret Davis President 

Jane Taliaferro Vice-President Elizabeth Shelton .... Vice-President 

Martha Davis . . . Secretary and Treasurer Martha Davis . . . Secretary and Treasurer 



THIRD QUARTER 

HoRTENSE Cobb President 

Elizabeth Shelton .... Vice-President 
Martha Davis . . . Secretary and Treasurer 



FOURTH QUARTER 

Sara Williams President 

Louise Gentry Vice-President 

Martha Davis . . . Secretary and Treasurer 



Class Councilors 



Taliaferro, Coleman and M. V. Davis . 
Cobb, Williams and Coleman .... 
Van Landingham, Williams and Gentry 
Williams, Carson and West .... 



. First Quarter 
Second Quarter 
■ Third Quarter 

Fourth Quarter 



General Councilors 

Belden, Shelton, and Marion Wadsworth 

Shelton, Taliaferro, and Martha Davis 

Cobb, Coleman, Taliaferro, and Marion Wadsworth . . . 
Coleman, Belden, Martha Davis, and Sara Williams ... 



. First Quarter 
Second Quarter 
. Third Quarter 
. Fourth Quarter 



Armstrong, Jean 
Belden, Louise 
Blanton, Elizabeth 
Bush, Carolyn 
Carson, Sara 
Cobb, Hortense 
Cockrell, Elizabeth 
Coleman, Gladys 
Davis, Margaret 
Davis, Martha 
Dickinson, Frances 
Douclass, Adelaide 
Dunbar, Eleanor 
Few, Mary 



Junior Roll 

Gentry, Louise 
Goodman, Catharine 
Goodrich, Martha 
Grady, Elizabeth 
Harvey, Mary Lewis 
Hatch, Margaret 
Huske, Wilhelmina 
Ing esby, Catharine 
Justus, Mary Elizabeth 
McKay, Charlotte 
McKay, Frances 
Menzies, Ellen 
M.enzies, Catharine 
Mock, Catharine 



Nesbitt, Myrtle 

Powell, Mary 

Reed, Mary 

Ross, Mary Bagley 

Shelton, Elizabeth 

Smith, Cora 

Stevens, Margaret 

Taliaferro, Jane 

Tollison, Catharine 

Toole, Louise 

Van Landingham, Martha 

Wadsworth, Marion 

West, Anna Dean 

Williams, Sara 



Page thiriy-fou 




t/1 

< 
u 

OS 

o 
z 
D 
»-> 



Page thirty-five 




Page ihirly-six 




Page thirty-seven 




Colors: Orange and Black 



Soph 



CL 



pnomore ^lass 

Adviser 
Miss Evelyn Byrd Graham 

Mascot 
Sophie Walker 



FloTVer : Black-eyed Susan 



Officers 



FIRST QUARTER 

President MacMillan 

Vice-President Holt, N. 

Secretary-Treasurer Moore 

f Jenkins 
Class Councilors -j MacMillan 

[ Moore 
General Councilor MacMillan 



THIRD QUARTER 

President MacMillan 

Vice-President Moore 

Secretary-Treasurer McLendon 

f Lowndes 
Class Councilors ■{ Moore 

[ Dale 
General Councilor MoORE 



SECOND QUARTER 

President MacMillan 

Vice-President Moore 

Secretary-Treasurer Jenkins 

f Dale 
Class Councilors ■{ McLendon 

[ Holt, N. 
General Councilor Moore 



FOURTH QUARTER 

President Lowndes 

Vice-President Moore 

Secretary-Treasurer Maybank 

f Yarborough 
Class Councilors { Maybank 

[ Lowndes 
General Councilor Lowndes 



Page thirty-eight 



Sophomore Ambitions 

MacMilLAN — To wear a nurse's cap. 
PLUMLY — To be a "Sweet Girl Graduate." 
W. HOLT — To grow a wee bit fatter. 
LOWNDES — To invent a hair-confiner. 
MAYBANK — To be "studious." 
M. WEBB — To be ambitious. 
M. WlNG — To be Fat Lady in a side show. 
Dale — To grow! 

RlCE — To be author of one of the "Six Best Sellers." 
HANBY — To be a "Shining Light." 
N. HOLT — To cook for a large family. 
YARBOROUGH — To "be a genius!" 
JENKINS — To be an expert terpsichorean. 
KlRK — To outrival Annette Kellerman. 
HOWELL — To have a nose that doesn't point heavenward. 
McLENDON — To succeed Dr. Kirk. 

BARNES — To have hair that dcesn't kink, and a face lhat doesn't re- 
semble the full moon. 
MOORE — To be good (if that is possible!) 
BERNHARDT — To be Eugenia's latest crush. 
BoWNE — To be an artist. 
HUSKE — To reduce (slightly!). 



Page thirty-nine 



The Coming of Spring 




HO spread the news? Was it jolly Mr. Sun, or the merry little breezes 
that whispered through the trees? Nobody knew; but everybody did 
know that it was true. All the little people of the forest and meadow 
were wildly excited about it, and bustled with their house cleaning as 
though their lives depended upon getting it done befcre the sun set. 
"It's coming! It's coming!" chattered the merry chipmunk. 

"Coming, coming!" echoed the bluejay. All the meadows and forests were alive 
with busy, happy, wee people who were getting ready for the Big Event. 

Jolly Mr. Sun seemed to smile more brightly than ever, and the stream that trickled 
so merrily down the valley seemed wild with joy and leaped over the pebbles, singing 
happy little tunes as it went. Was there ever such mystery and excitement in the air? 
"It is coming! It is coming! It is coming!" the very rocks seemed to cry out. 
Then, far over the meadows came a soft, sweet sound ; the little people stopped their 
work to listen. Nearer and nearer it sounded. "The bluebird!" they whispered to 
one another. 

"Spring! Spring!" he sang. "Spring! Spring is here. Spr-r-ring is here!" And 
everybody knew that it was so, for the bluebird always told the truth. 

Eleanor Rice, '23. 



The Herald of Spring 



What is the sign that spring is here? 

Birds or the first March flowers? 
Fresh green leaves or the soft spring wind? 

Sunshine and lengthening hours? 



Does the herald of spring come in the air? 

And do we know by that? 
No, spring's first sign is a well-kncwn one, 

It is the Easter Hat! 

Anne Be den, 71. 



i< 



assitern 



F is for Fassifern, a name to us dear, 
A is for Athletics, which bring us good cheer; 
S is for Miss Shipp, loved by one and all, 
S for her sister, presiding in dining-hall ; 
I is for Interest, we've got it, you bet! 
F for the Faculty, the very best yet. 
E is for Earnestness, which many need, 
R is for Rules which we don't always heed. 
Now altogether 'tis Fassifern, our school of schools indeed! 

Louise Belden, '22. 



Page forly 




Page forty-one 




Page forl\)-lv>o 




Freshman Class Poem 






First comes our little President, 

Armstrong is her name — 
With a quiet tongue and a modest way; 

But we love her just the same. 

Second in line s ands Shelton, 
Our big Vice-President is she, 

Well known for her giace in dancing 
And we surely like her, don't we? 

Since Brown helped write this poem 

Of her we little say, 
Except she has numerous crushes, 

And grows more romantic each day. 

Gibbons is a spunky girl, 

Our own true athlete; 
She leads us all in basketball. 

And thus we are seldom beat. 



Henderson joined us recently; 

She brags both "high" and "low," 
But we gladly overlook it, 

Because we love her so. 

N-n-next comes M-M-Montgomery, 

Stammering is her gift; 
But our Expression teacher 

Is giving her a lift. 

Marion is our Treasurer, 

Our President's right-hand man, 
Who seldom receives our dues, 

But does the best she can. 

Owens, the pepper box, 

Is the smallest of us all, 
But if you think you're smarter, 

Your pride will have a fall. 

And now I've come to Wallace, 
Who likes neither crimp nor curl, 

For she's the book-worm of our clacs, 
And a splendid all-round girl. 



Page forty-three 



Sad But True 



G?GDCD t& HE lime of my touching drama is twilight on a still, sultry summer evening. 
The place is the most romantic spot in any country town — the cemetery. 
The "dramatis personae" consist of two people only — Laura, aged fourteen, very 
_ ,, sweet looking and a lover of anything approaching sentimentality. Waller, aged 

(O^C^fS^S] sixteen, possessing a decided "cowlick" on top of his yellow head; a red, full 
face; more avoirdupois than he can comfortably carry; and, above all, a sincere 
"love for the ladies." 

As the scene opens these two are sitting on a flat tomb, rather aimlessly watching "lightnin' bugs." 
Laura seems impressed with the reverent silence of nature in this sacred spot. Walter appears acutely 
impressed with the mosquitoes. Finally she speaks. 

Laura: "Do you know, I believe if I came out here with some nice person real often, I could write 
most as good love stories as Florence Barclay. The air in the graveyard is jus' full of romance an' — ' 
Walter: "And mosquitoes!" I wish to thunder they'd leave me alone!" 

Laura: "Oh, you poor thing! Don't think about them. (Grows poetic.) Think of the beautiful 
flowerets on yonder grave! Think of the lovely lighlnin' bugs! Think of — ." 

Walter: "Aw, I've got more imporlant things to use my thinker on. (Grows very serious and 
embarrassed.) Listen here, Laura — (draws a deep breath and moves nearer), you know I think a heap 
of you — n, er — ah, I'd like to ask you something. (Thrills experienced by Laura ) Will you tell 
me, hones'?" 

Laura (quite softly and sympathetically): "Certainly I'll tell you, Walter, dear. What is it?" 
Walter (looking more uncomfortable than ever) : "Well, then, I wish you would tell me where you 
think is a nice place to take a girl to — to — (blushes furiously) — tell her you love her?" 

Laura: (Appears to think and rejoices inwardly): "To tell you the truth, Walter, I jus' couldn't 
think of any place better than a flat tombstone in a graveyard. It's so roman'ic!" (Solves the problem 
of distance between them by subtraction and hangs her head — and wails.) 

Deadly silence for a second or two. Finally, looking much relieved, Waller speaks: "You sure 
have taken a load off my mind, Laura, an' I'm ever so much obliged to you! I think you're right, an' I 
am a-comin' out here to this very spot, with your sister Mamie, tomorrow night n tell her what I have 
been a-tryin' to for two weeks!" 

(Curtain) 

Nancy Battle, '21. 




FATOE& ©@ES TOcSEOTY/^g KJ&M^ ©KG»«L* 






Page forty-four 






SIUULIB 



E S H 



f-"\ T". WAD5W oT^Tt-l- 



I 



Page forty-five 



^ 




_ O U 



Page forly-six 



The Hermit 




2S?§ ARV, old fellow, -it was mighty nice of you lo bring me round, and for Jove's sake 
55) don't tell the boys where I am. Remember that I am celebrating Christmas my own 
rv« way and I'd rather not be bothered; mail will go to my box at the ciub and I'm 
k not going to even open it. Good-bye!" 



^3^j^$^i As he stood on the steps of an apartment, one of a great many exactly alike, all 

fronting the street and all having a small flight of steps leading to a heavy oaken door, 
he watched a tall fellow disappear around the corner. Then he turned to the door behind him. 

Opening the door of the living room he saw his man Morris arranging the big chair in a comfortable 
way before the fire. 

"It's home now, Morris; we'll just live here until we get tired of it, it and being hermits. It's a 
nice place, I'll say. Who are our neighbors?" 

"The Colburns on the right, sir, and a lady named Chatham on the left." 

"Old maid, eh?" 

"No, sir, not to say an old maid. She is very pretty and considerable young." 

"Young and pretty, you say? That is just what I am trying to run away from; well, she'll never see 
me, anyway!" 

"She is very sociable, sir. Says she is coming to call." 

"The devil she is! Tell her I am crazy, blind or something, anything to keep her away; do you 
hear, Morris?" called Adams from the next room. 

So the housekeeping began. Richard Adams, aged twenty-seven, heir to several millions, and leader 
of society, had grown tired of festivity and run away for the holidays. Only his chum, Harvey Milton, 
knew of his whereabouts, and Morris had arranged the apartment. 

T he next morning when Adams awoke he heard Morris' voice on the steps. 

"He is not up yet, Miss." 

"Not up yet? Gracious, he is lazy!" 

That voice! It was deep; not low, but a delightful contralto with a note of happiness in it. 

"Morris, may I call today?" 

"Ah-no, Miss Chatham, he has given orders that he will see no one; he is not well, ma'am." 

"Oh, I am very sorry that he is not well; Christmas is coming, loo. Get him well by Christmas, 
Morris!" 

Dick laughed. Good old Morris! but that girl's voice! That must be Miss Chatham on the right. 
These persistent old gossips! She wanted to see him so she could gossip about him. But he could not 
imagine that voice gossiping about anyone. Well, he must forget neighbors, this was his vacation. 

The papers had come and he spent the morning reading them. Claire Pellers was giving a ball, his 
name was among those invited, most likely his invitation was in his box. Masters was staging a pageant; 
a note about that was in his box also, and perhaps a bid to Carrollton's stag dinner. Dick smiled; no 
evening clothes for a month, no flowers to send; no silly girls' talk to listen to — peace for a month! 

The door-bell rang. 

Silently Morris opened the door. Adams caught a glimpse of a red tarn, a wisp of brown hair, and 
the voice said: "Hang this up, Morris, Christmas is coming and your windows look like it was November!" 

When Morris showed him the wreath he frowned. "Yes, hang it up, but I was trying to forget 
Christmas! " 

When Morris left for the market his reading was continuously interrupted by zealous salesmen of 
holly, mistletoe, and cedar, until finally he stopped answering the door at all. 



Page forty-seven 



Lunch passed tranquilly, and about three o'clock Mrs. Colburn called. Morris answered her firmly. 
"No, madam, the master is not well and he refuses to see anyone. Yes, madam, I will tell him that 
you called." 

After dinner the phone rang and, Morris being busy in the kitchen, Adams answered it himself. 

The Voice spoke. "Morris, I called you up to tell you that your basement light is burning, sorry 
to have troubled you." 

"This is Adams speaking. I will notify Morris. Thank you, Miss Chatham." 

Would people never stop bothering him? Peace indeed! 

He rose and went to the front window. 1 he light from the house on the left looked very pretty 
and through the Colburns' windows he could see them, on very intimate terms. Heavens! Why 
didn't people pull their shades down! Then in Miss Chatham's front room he could see her. She was 
standing with her back to him, a slender figure in red, and before her stood a man; she was speaking 
to him, she held out her hands and he took them. Adams jerked his shade down. 

The following morning, needing a breath of fresh air, Adams went for a stroll around the block, 
choosing an early hour, scarcely thinking any of his neighbors would be out by seven-thiity on a Decem- 
ber morning. But he had barely taken twenty steps before he saw Miss Chatham (he supposed it was 
she as she wore a red tam) approaching him. "Oh, Mr. Adams, for aren't you he? I am so glad to see 
you are out!" 

"Yes, Miss Chatham, I am glad to be out also." There he was already, speaking in platitudes again, 
and one really shouldn't to this girl, she looked so fresh and happy. 

"May I join you in your walk? This is my regular hour for a walk; I love early winter mornings, 
don't you?" 

Adams did, but he sincerely wished that this girl didn't. She was so radiant with cheerfulness that 
it was catching, and Adams didn't wish to catch any cheerfulness. He slrode along without saying a 
word until his companion stopped her merry talk and was silent also. 

Suddenly she turned and faced him. "Mr. Adams, I'd like to ask you something. Perhaps you 
will think it too impertinent and won't answer it, and then again you might not let me even ask it, which 
will it be?" 

"Certainly ask it, Miss Chatham, and since you are so frank I will be frank also; I may not answer it." 

"Thank you. Well, it is just this: I want to know why you won't see anyone, why you won't be 
at all sociable, why you left all the gaiety of the winter season. Because, you see, I know you are 
THE Mr. Adams; of course I know that in all probabilities you won't answer me." 

Adams was silent, then he spoke: "That was a bit impertinent for so short an acquaintance as ours, 
but really I believe that I will tell you all you want to know if you promise faithfully not to breathe 
it to a soul." There was a twinkle in Dick's eye, but the girl did not see it and she answered solemnly 
that she would not breathe it to a soul. Dick walked slowly on and then he turned to the girl beside 
him. "You see, it was because I — you promise you will never tell? Well, you see it was because I 
got tired of all the winter gaiety you speak of and I ran away to the peace and solitude of an obsolete 
apartment. As for my unsociableness, why I didn't know what pleasant neighbors- I had!" 

"Oh, I thought that you had committed murder, robbed the Trust Company, or something equally 
serious! I am so relieved!" 

"And how did you know that I was THE Mr. Adams, as you so kindly said?" 

"I have heard mother speak of — oh, mercy, I have let the cat out the bag, haven't I?" 

"Are you Mrs. Arthur Chatham's daughter? Are you Nancy Chatham? No, you are not Nancy's 
age, she is only a little girl; can you by any chance be her sister?" 

"Now that you have let me speak for myself I can tell you that I am Nancy Chatham herself!" 

"Why, it seems only yesterday that I was at your house and you were about fifteen, merely a flapper; 
how can you be the same?" 

"That was five years ago and I was only a flapper then. I remember that time; you were taking 



Page forty-eight 



Elise to a ball and mother had let me slay up to see her dress and I was downstairs in my gingham frock 
when you came and you spoke to me. Elise said that I was awfully impudent, but you were the only 
person who spoke to me as if 1 was of some importance and I liked you for it." 

"Now, if you don't mind, I will take my turn at being impertinent and ask you why you are here." 

"And following your own good example I will tell you the truth. It was my year to 'come out,' 
as the expression goes, and I begged to be allowed to spend Christmas my own way before 'appearing' 
in February. So I was allowed to have my own way, and Julia and I (she is my old nurse) came here. 
It is just my may to make friends, and even though I came only a few days before you did, I know 
every one within three blocks of me! 

Adams laughed. "Well, I guess we are birds of a feather, running away from society. But how 
do you know you won't like it, you never have tried it?' 

"Mr. Adams, you are ridiculous. By merely looking at me one could tell that I would never like 
society! It is out of the question that I should." 

"So you have never been a debutante and had men send you flowers and bother you to death 
with attention?" 

"I shouldn't mind the flowers ifi they would only send roses and mignonette instead of orchids and 
those wild looking things!" 

"Very well, when you come out, if I am bidden to your ball I shall send you red roses and 
mignonette, but you will have to promise to wear them in preference to all your orchids and Parma 
violets." 

"I will; and don't forget that is a promise!" Nancy Chatham turned in at her door and waved a 
merry good-bye from her steps. 

Here he was already promising to send flowers to a girl who was not yet out. What a fool he was! 

Nancy Chatham paused in her front room and faced herself in the mirror. She had promised her 
mother that she would not see any man before she returned home for her debut, but Adams was only 
a neighbor and she also went to see the Colburns, so certainly there would not be any harm in this 
friendship. Mrs. Chatham was wise when she made that stipulation; Nancy was destined for a brilliant 
marriage, and her impulsiveness might vent itself by selecting a husband of its own choice. And besides, 
the two other Chatham girls had been snatched up by the most desirable men in the field. Alice was 
now the Countess Hartym; and Elise, after two brilliant winters, had married Horace Van Byrne and 
was now one of the prominent young matrons in society. Nancy, however, was destined to outshine 
her two older sisters and lead the debutantes of the coming season. So Nancy's plans for herself lay 
unsuspected and undiscovered while those of her mother went serenely on. 



Christmas eve arrived. Adams and Nancy had seen each other frequently on their early morning 
walks which, strangely enough, appealed to both of them. So when early that morning Adams appeared 
on his steps what was more natural than that he should call to Nancy Chatham standing on her doorstep: 
"Good morning, shall we walk together?" 

"Certainly, let's discuss our Christmas plans; what are yours?" 

"I have none; my Christmas is to be spent very quietly. We are trying to forget Christmas at 
my house." 

"Trying to forget Christmas! Mr. Adams, are you crazy?" 

"No, only extremely sensible; Christmas is a waste of time and energy." 

"I know you are crazy; please tell me what are your reasons for this wild view of yours?" 

"Well, you see, you are wasting time preparing for a single da,y, and you are friendly for a single 
day with people you decline to speak to the rest of the year; therefore the whole thing is a farce." 

"I see I shall have to take you in hand and convert you to the true meaning of the day. It is 
not only silly but sacrilegious for you to speak so." 

"Please don't try to convert me, Miss Chatham. I have carefully spent every Christmas in the 



Page forty-nine 



customary way ever since I can remember, and I took this 'vacation' in order that I might keep it for 
once in my own way." 

"No, the trouble is that you have been keeping it exactly the wrong way. Let me see what you call 
keeping Christmas the right way; did you send cards to everyone you know?" 

"Yes, every one; and silly expensive gifts to those that expected them." 

"Did you go to church Christmas morning?' 

"Went to that fashionable Avenue church where the minister preaches against the sins of the poor 
every Christmas." 

"Did you go calling that afternoon?" 

"I DID! I went to see every old dowager that sent me 'At Home' cards." 

"Did you go to bed after a dance, wishing that Christmas didn't come every year?" 

"I did, and I sincerely wished Christmas didn't come at all." 

"Mercy, you kept it entirely the wrong way! Will you let me show you the right way tomorrow?" 

"But you see, Miss Chatham, I came off here to keep it my own way!" 

"Please let me show you the right way! I'm sure that if you knew it you would love it." 

Finally it ended that Adams was to keep the following day in the way Miss Chatham guaranteed 
to be the only true and correct way to keep it. 

While he was at luncheon Morris brought in a large bundle with the message that Miss Chatham 
said he was to sign his name to these and not just slip his card in them. So he settled himself to the 
job of sending cards to every one in the block — the grocer, the janitor, his laundress, his tailor, and 
many others. Miss Chatham had addressed the cards and the job of sending them was lessened by the 
humor of his situation. 

The cards finished, his benefactor called for him and together they bought baskets for all the 
poor families of the neighborhood and delivered them personally. Then she instructed him to buy a 
present for Morris and put a note on it saying that he had the day free to do what he pleased. 

"But what shall I do for my meals?" asked Adams. 

"Why, Morris will get your breakfast and you are to take dinner with me, and we will see about 
supper later." 

So all responsibility was thus taken out of Dick's hands and he found himself sheepishly enjoying 
himself. 

At early breakfast on Christmas morning, to his surprise, he saw a small package by his plate. 
Upon opening it he found it to contain a note book from Morris. He thanked the poor man, who 
blushed and stammered his thanks for his pipe and the unexpected holiday. 

At a quarter to eleven Adams called by to take Miss Chatham to church and found her ready, 
looking very pretty in her red dress and soft brown furs. She wished him a merry Christmas, but did 
not ask him how he liked her way of celebrating. Dick blessed her for it as he would have hated 
to admit that he was enjoying himself immensely. 

They went to a small chapel where a kindly, grey-haired old rector welcomed them in and they 
took their places very near the back. The sermon was one which caught the interest of even Dick 
and held it; it repeated the old-time story in such a simple way that Dick found himself thinking of the 
times when his sweet-faced mother told it to him in her room. 

Dinner was very gay; the small dining room in Nancy's apartment was festive with holly and 
mistletoe; Nancy also was very festive. Dick soon caught the mood, and between them gay repartee 
flew back and forth and the hour passed far too quickly. Dick thought of the difference between this 
Christmas and the one a year ago; then he was taking dinner with the Marshalls, for it was Grace 
Marshall he was rushing just then. It was hard to compare the dim, gloomy old Marshall room with 
Grace sitting across the table from him with this cheerful, sunny room and the gay, laughing girl opposite. 
The comparison was not complimentary to the Marshalls. 

Dinner over, they went into the small sitting room and Dick laughed. "It was here that I first saw 
you. I was standing at my front window and I saw you standing in here with a man; I was in a 



Page fifi 



rotten humor then and, it made me still madder to see into other people's houses. So I jerked down the 
shade when I saw you hold out your hands to him ..." 

"Oh, that was Harry; you know Harry, for I have heard him speak of you." 

"Harry! Jove! I was getting worried for fear you had gentlemen callers! It never occurred to 
me that it might be your brother. Certainly I know Harry, he belongs to the same club I do; I should 
have recognized him." 

"Harry is the only one of my family that I allow to visit me in my exile. We have been chums 
ever since the days when he was in his teens and I was in rompers. We used to peep through the 
dining room door at the dinner parlies given for Sis when she first came out; you were fiar too young 
to come to those because they were for my oldest sister, Alice. I remember that Harry and I always 
hung around the pantry door and ate off the plates as they came out. It was shocking manners, we 
knew, but we never got anything but the 'leavings' anyway, so we took them then!'' 

Nancy looked at the tall man who leaned on her mantel and smiled; this was the Dick Adams 
she had heard Elise and her mother talk so much about. She knew better than ihey thought she did 
that it was Dick Adams that Elise had been destined for; and she also knew the wailing and gnashing 
of teeth in the Chatham house when the proposal did not come when the time for it had arrived. 

Elise was bitterly disappointed, and Nancy had lain awake in her little room next to Elise's one 
night while listening to the outpouring of the sorrow in her mother's ears. And together Nancy and 
Harry had written a fond, effusive love letter addressed to "Miss Elise Chatham" and signed "Dick." 
That letter was a calamity; Nancy was kept in her room for three days and Harry's allowance was 
stopped for two weeks. 

Dick turned to his hostess. "Miss Chatham, what do you plan to do now that Christmas is over?" 

"Go home and begin getting dresses for the fateful second day of February." 

"Am I to be asked to the ball?" 

"If you send the promised flowers." 

"Will you wear them?" 

"Certainly." 



Christmas being over, Morris packed up. The day little Miss Chatham left, the occupants of the 
apartment on the right departed also. 

February came and with it the engraved invitation to the coming out ball of Miss Nancy Anderson 
Chatham. 

Tony, the florist, received an order for as large a bouquet of red roses and mignonette as he could 
assemble. 

Then, on THE night when Dick entered the Chatham ball room he saw Nancy in plain white 
satin with a large bunch of red roses and mignonette instead of the usual orchids and Parma violets. 
When he could break in for a dance he did so and, as she laughingly pointed to her flowers, he bent 
down, asking, "Can we escape the mob?" Silently she led the way to a small niche hidden by a 
screen of flowers. 

"Well, Miss Chatham, how do you like being a debutante?" 

"Better'n I though I would — oh — I beg your pardon! I forgot! I am enjoying the beginning of 
my social activities extremely much, Mr. Adams." 

"Don't talk like that to me!" 

"Do you think yourself more privileged than anyone else, Mr. Adams?" She rose. 

He rose also and caught her hand. "Nancy, don't be so silly!" 

"I would thank you to let go my hand, Mr. Adams, and also to remember that I am known to you 
only as Miss Chatham." With this she left. 

Dick sat staring at the wall; he knew now that he loved little Nancy Chatham and he also knew 
that she didn t care a rap for him. Doggone it, he must convince her in some way to believe that he 



Page fyly-one 



loved her. Rejecting plan after plan, he sat there brooding and meditating until the guests began to 
leave. Then, at last, he walked straight up to her, saying bluntly, "I am going now, but please make 
up your mind before tomorrow evening as to what will be your answer to a question I am coming then 
to ask you. Good-bye." 

The next afternoon the Chathams were at home, and Nancy was receiving most of the attention. 
Her room was full of the most beautiful flowers that New York could produce; but she insisted on 
wearing a bedraggled bunch of red roses and still fragrant mignonette. 

The butler announced Mr. Adams. Nancy, however, did not once look up from the tea table where 
she was presiding. 

After speaking to Mrs. Chatham, Dick went straight to the tea table. Across the silver and china 
Nancy's "non-commital glance" coolly met the eagerness of the last arrival. "Lemon and how many 
lumps of sugar?" 

"No lemon, two lumps of sugar. I couldn't wait to tell you how I feel — did you get my note 
this morning?" 

"Not but one lump of sugar left, you will have to do with that; yes, I have decided." 

"Then don't give me any tea at all if I can't have what I want. In whose favor have you decided? 

"Yours. No — in your favor and — mine!" 

Mrs. Chatham turned to Elise who was beside her. "Nancy will need a lot of training, she has 
almost upset the tea table; and yet there she is talking lo that young Adams as if everything were serene!" 

Marion Wadsworth, '22. 



Tne Soliloquy of a 1921 Maiden 

{With Apologies lo "The Mightiest Elizabethan") 

To shorten or not to shorten — that is the question; 

Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to retain 

One's modesty against the temptation of outrageous fashion. 

Or to defy maternal opposition, 

And by rebelling shorten them. To hem — to tuck — 

To tuck! perchance to scallop! Ay, there's the knee! 

For through that slash of skirt what views may come 

When we have shuffled off this colonial length, 

Must give us reflection : there's the brevity 

That makes calamity of good reputation, 

For who is left Jo wear the trailing gown of yesterday? 

Margaret Middleton, '21. 



Page fifty-two 




Page fifly-lhree 




Music Club 





Members 




Penn 


Harvey 


Sherrod 


Hickerson 


W. Holt 


Montgomery 


C. Menzies 


Mock 


Thompson 


Conroy 


Barnes 


Mauney 


ToLLISON 


Blanton 


Roberts 


Moore 


Toole 


Jenkins 


Plumley 


Inglesby 


Reynolds 


Powell 


C. Smith 


Walke 


Van Landingham 


Call 


Scales 


Brown 


M. T. Smith 

Dale 

G. Armstrong 

J. Armstrong 

Marion 

Grady 

J. Shelton 

Lawrence 


Henderson 



Page fifl\)-four 





■ ■ ■■■■ 


p- . ■;.--;:-;.^; ,| 




L_^j^^A 




71 *, A ^^ * .aMMl 



BOWNE 



Al LISON 



Holt 



Art Class 

Miss Weiss, Imlructor 

Members 



Parsons 



Kirk 



Shelton 

"Wadsworth, M. F. 
Bernhardt 

Howell 



Henderson 

Montgomery 

Dickinson 

West 



Page fifty -five 





1 fjf **& W hh 


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PI 




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Hflp~ ,. 





<— 



Dramatic Art 

Instructors 

Miss Huff Miss Weiss 



Roll 

Montgomery 



Battle 



Lesley 



Grimes 



Myers 



Bisbee 



Raney 



Cobb 



Wing, J. 



Birdsey 



Stevens 



Page fifty-six 




Domestic Science Class 

Miss Mary Thrall, Instructor 

Members 











CANDIDATES FOR CERTIFICATE 




Lawrence 

Lesley 

Norman 




Webb, 
Swink 


A. 


Raney Ross 
Guion Shelton, E. 
Grimes 

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 


Carson 

McLendon 

Scales 


Seaver 
Douglass 
Davis, M. 
Brown 


W. 


Dale 

Cockrell 

Huske 


Holt, N. Hanby 
Owens Stephens 
Yarborough Inglesby 


Shelton, J 

Rice 

Wallace 



Domestic Art Class 

Miss M. H. Sampson, Instructor 







Members 




Guion 


Harvey 


Plumly 


Moore 


Webb, A. 


Goodman 


Mcck 


Borden 



Battle 



Page fifty-seven 



Tke Hathaway Cottage 




BID ye welcome, I bid ye welcome," cried old Dame Hathaway. 'Tis 
a pleasure to have you in our humble dwelling, Mistress Nancy. Sit ye 
down whilst I fetch Anne. Marry! But that wench is the trial of my 
life! From the crowing of the cock 'till the sun quits a smilin' at 
itself in the Avon, she is up and away. I'll wager ha'pence she is leading 
that scamp, Will Shakespeare, around by his bushy forelock this minute!" 

As she bustled away I sat down to ponder o'er her "humble dwelling." I know not 
when it had been my good luck to dwell upon so pleasant a subject. 

The house itself peeps out from under a thatched roof from which do rise three 
chimneys as sentinels watching o'er the meadows i' the distance. Can't you see the fire- 
flies a-twinkling in the dusk o'er those meadows? 

The face of the dwelling turns toward the garden so gay with shrubs and flowers — 
all the colors o' the coat o' Joseph! These flowers are a-blooming from May Day 'till 
May Day, for the climate in our Stratford town is wondrous mild. 

From this beautiful spot rough stone steps lead up to the small door through which 
my hostess so heartily bade me enter. 

Dame Hathaway is indeed a shrew, but what o' that, pray tell me? Is she not 
reputed the neatest in our town? The gravel walk leading from the picket fence defies 
any rival on smoothness. The stone steps are scrubbed wi' sand every day. Nowhere 
in Merrie England can a person find boxwood so keenly cut. The window panes are 
polished with such brilliance, truth, one thinks them eyes a-twinkling! As for the in- 
terior — if thou canst find but one spot o' dust from the low, wooden-beamed ceiling to 
the stone floor, I'll tread the measure wi' ye from Trinity Church and back again next 
Sunday morn! 

Because of the lowness of the ceiling, the sparse furnishings, and the lack o' many 
windows, at first sight one would think 'twas not a cheery place; but the spindle in the 
corner and the kettle always humming so merrily on the hearth, to say naught of puss 
asleep on the door sill, all go to make it homelike. And — 

"I tell ye, I won't go in!" suddenly burst loudly upon my calm meditations. "Not 
with my William a-waiting for me by the river! Know ye not the maypops are o'er 
ripe and waiting to be gathered?" 

Quite silently I took me out o' the back door which leads onto the street. 

Nancy Battle, '21. 



Page fifty-eighl 




General Council 





First Quarter 




Wright, Chairman 


Grimes 


JVIarion Wadsworth 


Battle 


E. Shelton 


MacMillan 


Walker, S. F. 


Belden 
Second Quarter 


Moore 


Wright, Chairman 


Battle 


M. V. Davis 


Seaver 


E. Shelton 


Moore 


Myers 


Taliaferro 

Marion Wadsworth 

Third Quarter 


MacMillan 


Myers, Chairman 


Russell 


Taliaferro 


Battle 


Call 


Lowndes 


Wright 


Cobb 


Moore 


G. Wadsworth 


Marion Wadsworth 
Coleman 

Fourth Quarter 


MacMillan 


Myers, Chairman 


Call 


Belden 


Battle 


Borden 


Coleman 


Wright 


Roberts 
Williams 
M. V. Davis 


Lowndes 



Page fifty-nine 



Cnronicle of Scnool Events, 1920-1921 



SEPTEMBER 

7 — Registration of students. 

10 — Episcopalian students entertained by Mrs. 
Farnum. 

18 — Old girls' party to new girls. 

19 — Mrs. Witherspoon and Miss Witherspoon 
entertain faculty at an informal tea. 

24 — Moving picture party for students by Prin- 
cipals. 

OCTOBER 

2 — Red Cross picnic. 
7 — Fassifern's birthday. 

18 — Seniors attend barbecue given by C. M. N. 
A. and game, C. M. N. A. vs. Blue Ridge. 
18 — Miss De Blanc entertains the faculty. 
20 — Tea by senior domestic science class to 

Seniors. 
30 — Masquerade given by new girls to old girls. 

NOVEMBER 

8 — John Powell, pianist. 

)9 — "Hurdy Gurdy Girl" presented by students. 
26 — Baptist entertainment. 

DECEMBER 

9 — Eddy Brown, violinist. 
11— C. M. N. A. Cotillion Club dance for the 

Seniors. 
14 — Lecture by Prof. Wm. G. de Coligny. 
19 — Episcopal entertainment. 
20 — Presbyterian entertainment. 
21 — Symphony orchestra. 
23 — Christmas carols by Seniors. 
23 — Christmas holidays begin. 

JANUARY 

26 — Holidays end. 
27 — Tollefsen Trio. 
29 — Class stunt night. 



FEBRUARY 
5 — Tacky party. 
16 — Lecture by Prof. Wm. G. de Coligny. 
19 — Book ball by Juniors. 

22 — Presbyterians entertained by the Ladies' Aux- 
iliary. 
28 — Miss Buckner and Miss Graham entertain 
at a faculty tea. 

MARCH 

5 — Fancy dress ball by Sophomores. 
12 — Constance Mackay and Booth Tarkington 

program. 
28— Mrs. Oates' tea. 
31 — Lecture on "Birds" by Mrs. Barnwell. 

APRIL 

9 — Faculty recital, Miss Dowd and Miss 

Butman. 
15 — Freshman-Sophomore basketball game. 
28 — Junior-Senior basketball game. 

MAY 
2 — Certificate recital, Madeline Call. 
6 — Tea to Seniors at Park Hill, Miss Wither- 
spoon, hostess. 
7 — Senior plays. 

10 — Sophomore-Senior basketball game. 

12 — First domestic science certificate luncheon. 

14 — Junior-Senior banquet. 

1 7 — Senior sneak day. 

17 — Second domestic science certificate luncheon. 

19 — Sophomore-Freshman party to the' Seniors. 

20 — Miss Farmer entertains faculty. 

21 — Field day. 

24 — Children's spring recital. 

27 — "Alice in Wonderland," presented by the 
Dramatic Club. 

28 — Class Day. 

28 — Annual recital. 

29 — Baccalaureate sermon. 

30 — "A Day in May," Commencement pageant. 

30 — Graduation exercises. 



Page sixty 



"Greatness is the holding of a great dream." 

The Fassifern Alumnae Association was organized on May 21, 1920, by the 
Class of 1920. Officers were elected as follows: 

Officers 

Mildred Sedberry , President 

Martha Powell i Vice-President 

Evelyn Byrd Graham Treasurer 

Ellen Allston . Corresponding Secretary 

Deane Van Landingham Recording Secretary 



Ellen Allston 
Elizabeth Angus 
Nancy Battle 
Josephine Bird 
Leonora Blount 
Margaret Bragaw 
Elizabeth Burwell 
Gozeal Call 
Madeline Call 
Lucy Neal Carr 
Nell Carson 
Annie Chadbourne 
Mary Clinkscales 
Mary Cobb 
Anna Cruikshank 
Lucy Dermid 
Eloise Gettys 
Evelyn Byrd Graham 
Jane Grimes 
Lida Guion 
Jane Guignard 
Katherine Hargrave 
Mable Hawkins 

Mrs. A. C. McBee 



Members 

Elizabeth Hickerson 
Edith Hoffman 
Margaret Huske 
Mary Johnston 
Mary Kemper 
Emma Troy King 
Marion Knight 
Deane Van Landingham 
Mrs. Charles Vernon 
Gertrude Wadsworth 
Margaret Wadsworth 
Sara Fenner Walker 
Mary Lybrook Lasater 
Jane McMillan 
Emily McRae 
Mrs. H. M. Mann 
Lucille Morris 
Betty Myers 
Sallie Lou Packard 
Frances Parker 
Kate Rucker Penn 
Mrs. Louis Poag 

Honorary Members 

Miss Kate C. Shipp 
Miss M. H. Sampson 



Martha Powell 
Mrs. Tom Pugh 
Ruth Pulliam 
Margaret Raney •— — . 
Margaret Roberts 
Jean Robinson 
Jane Russell 
Virginia Ryder 
Jennie Laine 
Mrs. H. Scarron 
Nora Seaver 
Mildred Sedberry 
Lucile Sherrod 
Pauline Simmons 
Claudia Smith 
Mary Thorpe Smith 
Mae Katherine Swink 
Mrs. C. M. Thacker 
Mary Badham Tucker 
Alice Webb 
Mary Wilcox 
Annette Wright 
Caroline Yancey 

Miss E. L Steinbrenner 



Page sixty-one 




Q 
7. 

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J 
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DC 

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Page sixty-lvo 







Page sixly-lhree 




T. K. S. 

Founded in 1919 
Colors: Green and Gold Faculty Adviser: G. R. Weiss 

Officers 

N. Battle Dean 

A. Wright Secretary and Treasurer 

M. Wadsworth Vice-Dean 

G. Wadsworth Manager of Properly 

Members 

Mary Birdsey Hortense Cobb Margaret Roberts 

Betty Myers Virginia Dale Alice Webb 

Margaret Raney Jane Grimes Sara Carson 

Jane Rus&ell Kate Rucker Penn Sara Williams 

Pledges 

Members of R. O. S. W. 

Honorary Members 

Mrs. McBee Miss Shipp 



Page sixty-four 








Sara Lesley 
Lucy Neal Carr 



Cora Smith 
Frances McKay 



Founded in 1919 
Colors: Red and Black Flower: Poppy 

Officers 

Margaret Davis President 

Mae Katharine Swink Vice-President 

Mary Thorpe Smith . . _ Secretary 

Lucille Sherrod Treasurer 

Evelyn Byrd Graham Adviser 

Members 

Stella Norman Annie Borden 

Anna Laurence Madeline Call 

Pledges 

Mary Powell Frances Dickinson 

Margaret Stevens Caroline McLendon 



Page sixty-five 




Color: Baby Blue 



Flower: Blue Bottle 



Baby Margaret 
Baby Gertrude 
Baby Marion 



Nursery 

Baby Sadie 
Baby Mardy 
Baby Jane 
Baby Sara 
Baby Nancy 



Baby Alice 

Baby Mary Bagley 

Baby Caroline 



In Charge of 
Mrs. McBee Miss Shipp 



Page sixty-six 




Colors : Toadfrog Green 



Flower: Toadstool 



Motlo : 



Members 

Mary Begonia Ross, B.F. 

Martha Verbena Davis, T.F. 

Peggy Crocus Coleman, H.T. 

Adelaide Canna Douglass, H.T. 

Lois Zinnia Gettys, H.T. 

Margaret Arbutus MacMillan, H.T. 

Martha Edelweiss Moore, H.T. 

Lib Lily Shelton, H.T. 

Jane Gekanium Taliaferro, H.T. 

Marion Hyacinth Wadsworth, H.T. 

Catharine Cactus Goodman, LIT. 



Page sixly-scvcn 




Color: Blue 



B. B. Club 

Moilo: Not merely to exist but lo mean something in life. 
Mascoi: Happiness 

Frances Scales President 



Flower ; Forget-me-not 



Dorcas Carland 
Elizabeth Henderson 



Members 

Frances Reynolds 
Evelyn Walke 



Sophy Walker 
Carolyn Wallace 



Page sixty-eight 




The Golden Fleece 

Josephine Wing First Shepherdess 

Shearers 

McLendon Goodman 

Glenn Moore 

Tucker 



Page sixl\)-nine 




Glee Club 



Miss Dowd Director 



Battle, Nancy 
Cobb, Hortense 
Conroy, Helen 
Davis, Margaret 



First Sopranos 

Glenn, Louise 
Grady, Elizabeth 
Harvey, Mary Lewis 
Lawrence, Anna 
McKay, Frances 
Powell, Mary 



Sherrod, Lucille 
Smith, Cora 
Thompson, Emma 
Van Landingham, Martha 



Call, Madeline 



Second Sopranos 

Dale, Virginia 
Mauney, Winnie Vera 



Wright, Annette 



Borden, Annie 



Altos 

Dunbar, Eleanor 



Penn, Kate Rucker 



Accompanists 

Call, Madeline Van Landingham, Martha 



Page seventy 





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Mandolin and Guitar Club 



Officers 

Call Director 





Cobb . . . 










Members 




Blanton 




McKay, C. 


Menzies, E 


Dale 




McKay, F. 


Rice 


Gibbons 




Menzies, C. 


Shelton J. 


Howell 






Wing, M. 



Page se^enly-one 




Dramatic Club 

Officers 

Battle President 

Myers Secretary and Treasurer 

SeaVER Costume Designer 

BlRDSEY Property Mistress 

Members 

Battle Dunbar Shelton, J. 

Belden Goodman Seaver 

Birdsey Gentry Taliaferro 

Blanton Glenn Thompson 

Carland Henderson Van Landingham 

Cobb Lesley Wadsworth, M. 

Coleman Mauney Walker, S. H. 

Dale Myers Walke 

Davis, M. V. ._ » Raney * ' Williams 

Douglas Scales Wright 

Shelton, E. 



Page seVent\)-tV>o 



The Hurdy-Gurdy Girl 

CAST 

Simon Luggate Wilhelmina Huske 

Theodore Luggate Adelaide Bisbee 

Marion Luggate Betty Myers 

Clarissa Luggate Louise Belden 

Carlotta Vernon Nancy Battle 

Susie Hortense Cobb 

Antonio Columbus Annette Wright 

Jim Stearnes MADELINE Call 

Algernon Claucy Mary Bagley Ross 

Jack Grover Margaret Bracaw 

Billy Mason Eleanor Dunbar 

Tom Murry Margaret Middleton 

Aristotle Lutzon Dorothy Parsons 

Mary Dayion Sara Williams 

Helen Dayton Edwina McMillan 

Dolly Stearnes Josephine Wing 

Josie Hopkins Jane Taliaferro 

Maisie Deane Winnie V. Mauney 



Anne Borden 
Adrianne Hanby 
M. K. Swink 



BACHELOR GIRLS' CLUB 

Eloise Gettys 

Alice Lowndes 

M. Van Landincham 



Louise Glenn 
Margaret Raney 
A. Lawrence 



Mackay-Tarkmgton Program 

1. "The Prince of Court Painters" Constance Mackay 

CAST 

Mary Romney Nancy Battle 

Romney (the Prince) Betty Myers 

Lucy Sophy Walker 

2. "Gretna Green," Read.ng HoRTENSE Cobb 

3. "Seventeen," Reading JOSEPHINE WlNG 

Alice In Wonderland 

CAST 

Alice • Hortense Cobb 

Queen of Hearts Louise Belden 

Duchess Nora Seaver 

Dormouse VIRGINIA Dale 

Cheshire Cat Marion Wadsworth 

Halter CATHERINE GOODMAN 

White Rabbit Betty Myers 

March Hare Sara WlLLIAMS 

King of Hearts Emma Thompson 

Knave of Hearts Mary Birdsey 

Executioner Louise Gentry 

Gryphon Louise Glenn 

Mock Turtle Eleanor Dunbar 

Fairy Josephine Wing 

Guard Gladys Coleman 



Page sevenly-lhree 





Molto : While I live I hope Flower : Palmetto 

Officers 

Van Landingham President 

Tucker Vice-President 

Williams Secretary-Treasurer 

Miss Witherspoon Adviser 

Members 

Cobb Maybank Tollison 

Dunbar McKay, C. Webb 

Inglesby McKay, F. Wing 

Lowndes Nesbitt West 

Thornley 

JUUT 

Warn _ |:; ; 





Page seventy-four 




Georgia-Florida Club 

Colors: Orange and Blue Floiver : Orange Blossom 

Mascot: Alligator 

Members 

Sara Lesley Tampa, Fla. Virginia Dale Gainesville, Fla. 

Margaret Wing Tampa, Fla. Elizabeth Cockrell . . . Gainesville, Fla. 

Mary BlRDSEY Savannah, Ga. Eloise Gettys Jeffersonville, Ga. 

- 4 

Western North Carolina Club 



Officers 

Gladys Coleman, Asheville President 

Nora Seaver, Waynesville Vice-President 

L. Glenn, Asheville Secretary and Treasurer 



Members 



Lucy Bernhardt Lenoir 

Ruth Bowne Tryon 

Eugenia Brown Asheville 

Dorcas Carland Asheville 

Elizabeth Grady Tryon 



Thomasine Howell Waynesville 

Catharine Menzies Hickory 

Ellen Menzies Hickory 

Mary Reed Asheville 

Frances Reynolds Asheville 



Page seventy-fivt 



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Guilford County Club 

Members 

Georgia Armstrong 

Annette Wright Jean Armstrong 

Lucille Sherrod Frances Scales 

Lucy Neal Carr Carolyn Bush 

Stella Norman Betty Myers 

Charlotte Club 

Officers 

Mary Bagley Ross President 

Jane Taliaferro Vice-President 

Marion Wadsworth Secretary 

Sara Carson Treasurer 

Gertrude Wadsworth Dean 

Ada Montgomery Vice-Dean 

Margaret Wadsworth Chairman 

M. V. Davis Vice-Chairman 

(All officers drew Iols.) 



Page seventy-six 




Officers 

Katharine Goodman President 

Louise Belden Vice-President 

Nell Holt Secretary and Treasurer 



Members 



Bernhardt, Lucy Lenoir, N. C. 

Borden, Annie Goldsboro, N. C. 

Blanton, Betty Shelby, N. C. 

Call, Madeline .... Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Conroy, Helen Cullowhee, N. C. 

Davis, Margaret .... Morganton, N. C. 
Gentry, Louise Noblesville, Ind. 



Gibbons, Elizabeth . 
Harvey, Mary Lewis . 
Hickerson, Elizabeth 
Holt, Whitney . . 
Huske, Wilhelmina 



. . Hamlet, N. C. 
. . Kinston, N. C. 

. . Ronda, N. C. 

. . Duke, N. C. 
Fayetteville, N. C. 



Jenkins, Sadie Avondale, N. C. 

Kirk, Westray Oyster Bay, L. I. 

Lawrence, Anna .... Lumberton, N. C. 
Little, Mary Bridgman . Washington, N. C. 



MARION, Katherine . . . Mount Airy, N. C. 
Mauney, Winnie V. . King's Mountain, N. C. 
Mock, Catherine . . . Thomasville, N. C. 

Moore, Martha Gastonia, N. C. 

McLendon, Caroline . . Wadesboro, N. C. 

Owens, Doris Plymouth, N. C. 

Penn, Kate Rucker . . . Madison, N. C. 

Powell, Mary Oxford, N. C. 

Stevens, Margaret .... Clinton, N. C. 
Stephens, Juliet .... Martinsville, Va. 
Thompson, Emma .... Southport, N. C. 

Toole, Louise Knoxville, Tenn. 

Wallace, Carolyn Galesburg, 111. 

Walke, Evelyn Richmond, Va. 

Webb, Alice Hillsboro, N. C. 

Yarborough, Eleanor . . Louisburg, N. C. 



Page sevenij-seVen 



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Members 
Matilda Barnes Francis Dickinson 

Cora Smith 
Mary Thorpe Smith 



Page seventy-eight 



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Cotillion Club 



Madeline Call, Leader 













Mem 


BERS 












Lawrence 


















Wadsworth, 


G 


Davis, 


M. 


G. 














Shelton, 


E. 




Birdsey 














Shelton, J. 










Borden 










MacMillan 












Glenn 








Smith, 


C. 














Hanby 






Sherrod 
















Cobb 


Carr 


McKay 
Moore 


F. 











Wright 



Page sevenly-ntr.e 



THE SATVBPAY 
EVENING POST 

An ii j^ l £iBi£^^ ee ^^y 

Tom -lrxcleci^frTTTnfnilirrn]! I f 1 1 1 II! I HllllIEnnnrrn»i^"Fir^L»xWi » t\ 







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Page eighty 




ATMIOC5 





Page eighty-one 




;ave 



nd 



ers 



J. Armstrong 

Battle 

Barnes 

Beleen 

Birdsey 

Blanton 

Brown 

Call 

Carr 

CoCKRELL 

Dale 

M. V. Davis 

Dunbar 

Goodman 

Guion 

Grady 



Roll 

Hanby 

HlCKERSON 

W. Holt 

HUSKE 

Jenkins 

Kirk 

Lesley 

Little 

Lowndes 

MacMillan 

C. McKay 

F. McKay 

McLendon 

Mauney 

Maybank 

Mock 

Norman 

Roberts 

Reynolds 



Rice 

Scales 

E. Shelton 

J. Shelton 

Sherrod 

J. Stephens 

Taliaferro 

Thompson 

Thornley 

Van Landincham 

G. Wadsworth 

S. F. Walker 

Yarborouch 

Carson 

Henderson 

Bush 



Page eight\)-ln>o 




Whites 



G. Armstrong 

Bernhardt 

Bowne 

Borden 

Carland 

Cobb 

Coleman 

Conroy 

Davis, M. G. 

Douglass 

Gentry 

Gettys 

Gibbons 

Glenn 

Grimes 

Harvey 



Roll 

Howell 

Holt, N. 

Inglesby 

Lawrence 

Marion 

E. Menzies 

C. Menzies 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Myers 

Nesbitt 

Owens 

Plumley 

Powell 

Reed 

Russell 

Seaver 

C. Smith 



M. Stevens 

tollison 

Tucker 

M. Wadsworth 

M. F. Wadsworth 

Walke 

S. H. Walker 

A. Webb 

M. Webb 

Williams 

Wright 

Dickenson 

J. Wing 

M. Wing 

Swink 

M. B. Ross 



Page eighty-lhree 




CI 



ass learns 



Senior 

Walker, S. F., Conroy Coals 

Birdsey, Wadsworth, M. F Guards 

Wright Center 

Mauney Side-Center 

Battle Cheer Leader 



Junior 

Douglass, Goodman Coals 

Armstrong, J., Shelton, E Guards 

Belden Center 

Coleman Side-Center 

Davis, M., Ross Cheer Leader 



Sophomore 

Holt, N., Maybank Goals 

Yarborough, MacMillan Guards 

Lowndes Celnter 

Dale Side-Center 

Barnes Cheer Leader 



Freshman 

Shelton, J., Montgomery Coals 

Armstrong, G., Gibbons Guards 

Marion Center 

Owens Side-Center 

Brown Cheer Le 

Winner of class championship, 1921 : Sophomores 



ider 



**V *» Ml 



'idV^^ ■ASa^r 




Page eighty-four 



ennis 



Club 





Members 




Battle 


Grimes 


Shelton, J. 


Belden 


Hickerson 


Tucker 


Birdsey 


Lesley 


Taliaferro 


Coleman 


Little 


Van Landincham 


Davis, M. V. 


Lowndes 


Walker, S. F. 


Douglass 


MacMillan 


Williams 


Gibbons 


Marion 


West 


Goodman 


Montgomery 

Maybank 

Moore 

Raney 

Ross 

Shelton, E. 


Wright 



Baseball Teams 

Lavenders 

Shelton, E Pitcher 

Birdsey Catcher 

ROBERTS First Baseman 

ARMSTRONG, J Second Baseman 

BeLDEN Third Baseman 

Lowndes Shortstop 

MAUNEY Right Field 

YaRBOROUGH Center Field 

Maybank Left Field 

Whites 

Douglass Pitcher 

Smith, C Catcher 

Gibbons First Baseman 

TUCKER Second Baseman 

CoNROY Third Baseman 

Coleman Shortstop 

Wright Right Field 

Marion Center Field 

Wadsworth, M. F Left Field 



Page eighty-five 



Field Day 

May 21, 1921 

Event Winner 

High jump Grady 

Running broad jump LoWNDES 

Standing broad jump GRADY 

Fifty-yard dash GlBBONS 

Hundred-yard dash GlBBONS 

Baseball throw SHELTON, E. 

Walking (form) WlNG, J. 

Baseball game won by LAVENDERS 
Athletic Pennant won by LAVENDERS 



Tenn 



is 



Championship in Doubles won by DOUGLASS and SHELTON, E. 
Tennis Cup (Singles) won by LoWNDES 

Basketball 

1 92 1 Championship won by SOPHOMORE TEAM. 



Page eighth-six 




Page eighty-seven 



'Lights and Shadows 



SEPTEMBER 
8 — "Fling wide open the golden gates." We 

entered. 
11 — Bible classes formed. Gip Webb enlight- 
ened us by innocently remarking that Abra- 
ham's occupation was grazing. 
12 — Classes start (and finish us). 
1 7 — Old girls give new girls a party. New girls 
furnish all necessary entertainment. 

OCTOBER 

1 — Everybody forgot to say "Rabbit," so there 

was no package list for two days. 
9 — Spoken English Department opened. Nuf 
ced. 
Hallowe'en — Who said "cry baby?" Must've 
been a "coward.' 

NOVEMBER 
2 — New girls' party. Tell you about it? We 
strive to please, but our vocabulary ain't so 
substantial as that. 
6 — Current Events Class met as usual. "M. B." 
delivered the startling information that scien- 
tists have discovered that an apple a day 
keeps the doctor away. 
7 — Marion Wadsworth returns as a daughter of 
Chief Bushy Head. Riot in main building. 
19 — All of Miss Abbott's French Class was on 
the Honor Roll. All of 'em! Deep stuff. 
20 — Little Edna went to class without Imperial 
Summons. Kindly introduce us to the mis- 
led guy that said the age of miracles has 
passed. 
24 — "On our way rejoicing." "Homeward 

bound." "Back again." "Lonesome.' 
29 — Studies resumed. "Yeth, ain't it fierth?" 

DECEMBER 
7 — English V gave a reading of Hamlet. Lucy 
Neal as Ghost made the biggest hit — ap- 
peared only once. 
12 — Plebescite cry: "Two more weeks, etc." 
18 — Exam had English V. 



20 — Carolers went to hospital — all patients are 

doing better, thanks. 
22 — Five weeks' intermission, please. 

JANUARY 

26 — The Prodigals. "Oh, I had the best time, 

and he's got the blackest, waviest hair I 

ever hope to see!" 
27 — Tollefson Trio. Aw, shucks! 

FEBRUARY 
14 — Valentine's Day. Soul stuff flies thick and 

fast. 
20 — Fassifern overrun by hoppy toads, but we 

noticed the girls didn't scream and run the 

other way. 

MARCH 

1 — Miss Huff conceives the idea of Alice in 
Wonderland. Worse luck. 

15 — Mrs. Wooten arrives to take pictures. We 
wish that Cecil B. & David Wark & Mary 
Pickford had been there. 

20-25 — Proofs come. "Do I look like thai?" 

25 — Some take leave. 

27 — Ask us what we did Easter Sunday after- 
noon. 

APRIL 

1 — April Fool. Thompson dominates. 
2 — Sara Lesley receives 10-lb. box of candy. 
Anonymous. 

MAY 
2 — Madeline Call's recital And when you talk 
about the "Flowers of May." I'll tell the 
world I love you — ta-tee-ta-tee-ta-ta-dee- 
dee— ." 
8 — Long bell rang. More hoppytoads. 
12 — Finale xams begin to rage. "The agony is 

not abated." 
20 — Final declaration of independence. 
28 — Final rehearsals for the pageant. "Gentle 

cow, pray tell me why? 
30 — The big day. Excitement and marshals pre- 
vail. Medals received. Oh, well, I didn't 
expect to get one, anyway. 
3 1 — Exeunt. 



Page eighty -eight 



HPEQAL 



FASSIFERN BESIEGED BY HOPPY-TOADS 



ENTIRE COMMUNITY AROUSED 
BY SUDDEN PEST! 



Grounds Monitors Called to Duty. 
Excitement Reigns ! 



Miss Shipp's School for Girls, 
Feb. 29, 1921. — Yesterday after- 
noon many of the little tots at 
this notable establishment were 
severely frightened by a Fordful 
of genus homo who had been lit 
with H20, making them a little 
more daring than is usual in this 
section. The Ford brutally wended 
its way up the spacious drive, 
frightening the little girls consid- 
erably with the noise. Miss Shipp, 
becoming worried in regard to the 
safety of her young charges, 
called out the reserves — namely, 
"Grounds Monitors." After much 
hard labor, Mr. Sumner, the trust- 
worthy defender of the juveniles, 
succeeded in dislodging the intrud- 
ers. 

Here's hoping that history will 
fail to repeat itself. 



LOOKING FORWARD TO THE 
EASTER HOLIDAY 



Just one more hour, when will it 

pass? 
Then for four days not a single 

class! 
Not a lesson to learn, not a bell 

to ring, 
Not even Miss Dowd to make us 

sing, 
No words to spell, no disorders to 

write, 
Just nothing to do from morning 

'till night! 

Margaret Raney, '21. 



LOST 

One pair No. 2Vz slippers. L. 
Belden. 

One heart, Marion Wadsworth. 
Finder please return to B. Myers. 



MY DOG 



You got a girl an' I got none, 
'Cause my dog, he's lots more fun. 
Girls is all such "scaries," 
Can't think of nothin' but dolls an' 

fairies! 
They is so careful an' clean; 
It jest makes me awful mean 
When they come prancin' out. 
I don't see why they pout 
When I chase 'em with my pet 

mouse. 
An' it alius makes 'em run in the 

house 
To tell their Mas I "mussed 'em 

up!" 
Now don't you think my pup 
Is lots nicer to have 'round 
Than any old girl was ever found? 
J. Wing, '21. 



THOl'CHTS 



Slowly the sun is sinking, 
The shadows tegin to fall; 

I sit in my corner thinking, 
As I wait for Study Hall. 

I think of my home far away, 
Of the friends I long to see; 

Of the many hard lessons today, 
And the many more to be. 

The light fades fast away, 

The birds have ceased to call, 

The stars have come to stay; 
So I hurry to Study Hall. 

Alice H. Webb, '21. 



THE LIGHT BELL 



Hark! the light bell has just 
sounded 
And I'm not yet ready for bed. 
My roommate between the sheets 
has bounded, 
With every curl fixed on her 
head. 



My hair will be straight tomorrow; 
And my lessons I'll not know — 
Much to my grief and sorrow — 

When I to my classes go. 
"Just a brief, precious moment 
more," 
I plead in Miss Jenny's unheed- 
ing ear; 
But lights go out; she's closed the 
door, 
And whispered, "Good night, 
dear." 

Elizabeth Cockrell, '22. 



WANTED 



One unbreakable rule. Address 
Chairman General Council. 

Pair Wizard Curling Irons. Ad- 
dress Helen Conroy, Catherine 
Goodman, Kate Rucker Penn, Jane 
Taliaferro, and a few others. 

One lamb-pie. Address "Mother." 

One bottle of Seven Sutherland 
Sisters Hair Tonic. J. Wing. 

One more middy suit. B. Blan- 
ton. 

On tall, blonde, dashing young 
hero; object matrimony. M. Call. 

One nose builder. T. Howell. 

One student body. B. Myers, 
undertaker. 



AUNT SUE'S CORNER 



Dear Aunt Sue: I am engaged 
and have been for 5 days. What 
makes my fiance close her eyes 
when I kiss her? — Curious Aintit. 

Dear Curious: Look in the mir- 
ror. Your affectionate, 

Aunt Sue. 



Dear Aunt Sue: What can I do 
to turn my hair from red to 
brown? Ittis Sorrel. 

Try Pyrene. 



Page eighty-nine 





Miss De Blanc (in Gym.): "Heels left! 
Knees bend! Backward kick! And be sure not 
to hit the girl in front of you." 



'Marion, did you find Miss Abbott?' 

'Yes, Miss Ricaud." 

'What did she say? 

'Nothing." 

'Nothing?" 

'Nothing." 

'How did that happen?" 

'She wasn't there." 

"I thought you said you found her." 

"I did. I found her out. ' 



There is a cute flapper called Dale 
Who grows just as fast as a snail, 

She'll ask if you know 

About how to grow, 
If you do, she'll keep hot on your trail. 



There was a young lady named Lesley 
Took dancing for grace expressly. 

When it she allained 

Her innards were pained. 
And her patience a great deal less Lesley. 



Misj Buckner: "Martha, what were the dates 
of Henry the Eighth?" 

M. Moore: "I don't know, but he must have 
had a lot. Six wives! Think of it!" 



We have with us a lady named Call 
Who fell in the spring in the fall. 

She let go her hold, 

And all isn't told, 
For she sprang in the spring and she fell in the 
fall. 

Nancy Battle: "Madeline, what time is it?" 
M. Call (looking at watch with picture of 
"Bill" on crystal) : "I don't know. Watch 
slopped." 

N. Battle: "I don't blame it. If I had any- 
thing that good looking so close to my face, I'd 
stop, loo." 

There was a young student named Battle 
Who made rule-breakers skedaddle. 

When asked why she did it. 

She'd never admit it, 
But had to live up to that "Battle." 

Hortense: "I haven't had a letter from Mac 
for a week.' 

Sara: "You can't depend on mails up here. 
Hortense: "I haven't seen any to depend on.' 

E. Shelton (in Domestic Science): "What's 
the first name of that day pupil Bisbee? 
M. B. Ross: "Postscript." 
Shelton: "How come?" 
Ross: "Adeline (Add-a-line)." 

M. T. Smith: "I have a new niece." 
L. Sherrod: "Boy or girl?" 








Page ninety 




Page ninety-one 



/fv\ 



The Education of Our Faculty 

"Booth Tarkington is a murderer and a fugitive from justice." — H. Maybank. 

"The Indian babies are called squabs." — Mauney. 

"An atheist is a person who dances on her toes." — Wallace. 

"A centurion is a man who is a hundred years old." — E. Rice. 

"Is the Idiocy and the Odyssey in the library?" — Sherrod. 

"Defoe wrote 'Robinson Crusoe' when he was fifty years old, then, regardless of his fame, died very 
poor." — Jenkins. 

"Shakespeare secured the plot of 'Macbeth' from the Book of Genesis." — E. Grady. 

"The nickname for the people who live in Virginia is 'Virginia Reels'; for those who live in North 
Carolina, 'Tar Babies'." — Douglas. 

"Samuel Johnson married Mrs. Porter, a widow, who had children as old as herself. " — Nesbitt. 

"A right triangle is a figure of three sides, two of which are parallel." — J. McMillan. 



To Be or Not to Be 

To be, or not to be — that is the question; 

Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to be a slave 

To dreary studies, or by a life of fun 

And ease, to neglect them utterly and thereby 

Make no Honor Roll. To rest — to doze — 

Alas, and by a sleep to say we end 

The headaches and the thousand irksome toils 

The "stude" is heir to — 'tis an occurrence 

Devoutly to be wish'd. To study — to learn — 

Perchance to "rate" the Honor Roll — 

Ay! There's the rub; 

For in that struggle, what tasks may come 

When we do burn the midnight oil ! 

What Latin prose! There's the thing 

That makes a failure in our strife. 

For who can bear the fierce wars of Caesar, 

The orations of great Cicero, his mighty words, 

Or brave Aneas, "weeping and wand'ring far? 

Or History with all the many dates 

That harass and nearly numb the mind? 

Who would these tedious lessons learn 

In order to hear her name read out 

On that high list where 'tis honor to be placed! 

And yet does conscience make "grinds" of us all ; 

And thus the natural longing 

To throw our tiresome books away, 

Is crushed by that Great Thing (!) 

And loses its action. Soft you, now! 

The Honor Roll ! Upon thy record 

Be all my labors placed! 

Nancy Battle, '21. 



Page ninety-ljvo 





#J§ ♦ t*ff f lit 




|t * 1 



Treshrncrt *; 5ubFreshmen~ 

preserrtinq Daisy Chain to 

Graduatinq Class. 



Page ninety-three 



Statistics, 1920-1921 

Best all 'round LOWNDES 

Most athletic BlRDSEY 

Best student Van LaNDINGHAM 

Most musical Call 

Dantiest CarR 

Best disposition Webb, A. 

Most generous Seaver 

Most attractive Battle 

Best leader of girls BATTLE 

Most original R°SS 

Best leader (dancing) WRIGHT 

Best follower (dancing) Powell 

Most popular Myers 

Cutest Cobb 

Sweetest Myers 

Most influential Myers 








■2-cut ^,L u hz h*>J-> r 




Page ninely-four 




Page ninety-five 



V acationists 



For the summer Miss Shipp has moved her office to Willanow, near Asheville, where 
she and Mrs. McBee are spending the vacation season. 

Miss Steinbrenner is enjoying a delightful visit with friends in Ireland. 

Miss Helen Abbott is spending the summer at her home in Northampton, Mass. 

Miss Ricaud has been in Virginia during most of the vacation period. 

Miss Buckner has become Senior Assistant in the Yorkville Divison of the New York 
Public Library. 

Mrs. Bruce Drysdale is at home in Hendersonville, after a pleasant visit to her parents 
in Pennsylvania. 

Miss de Blanc, after an extended trip to Boston and other New England towns, is at 
her home in New Orleans. 

Miss Martha Dowd has made Asheville her headquarters this summer. During July, 
Miss Dowd was in Philadelphia, doing some special advanced work in music. 

Miss Margaret Butman is at her home in Southport, Maine. 

Miss Weiss, after visiting in Atlanta, is now spending some time with her sister in 
Arizona. 

Miss Huff is conducting a very charming little tea room at her home in North Edge- 
combe, Maine, during the vacation season. 

Miss Mary Thrall is spending the summer with her parents in Asheville. 

Miss Jean Witherspoon has been doing graduate work at Columbia University during 
the summer session; she is spending the vacation period as substitute in the New York 
Public Library. 

Miss Sampson is enjoying visits with friends in Virginia, New York, and the West. 

Miss Westfeldt has spent the summer at her home in Fletcher. 

During the summer holidays Miss Evelyn Graham has enjoyed visits to Baltimore, 
Richmond, Va., and various points in North Carolina. 

Professor and Mrs. de Coligny are spending the summer at their old home in New 
Orleans. 

The Presbyterian College of Charlotte, Peace Institute, St. Mary's, Woman's (N. 
C.) College, Greensboro Woman's College, Converse, Hollins, Cathedral School, and 
Goucher College are among the institutions toward which Fassifern Seniors of 1 92 1 will 
begin "wending their way" early in September. 

Many of the Fassifern girls have enjoyed camp life in one "vacation retreat" or 
another; many others have "flitted" enthusiastically from house party to house party; 
still others are delighting more than anything else in "just being at home" and taking their 
accustomed places in the vacation life of "the home town" or of some favorite summer 
resort. 

"Rambler." 



Page ninety- 



"OUR FRIENDS" 



Page ninel\;-seven 



WOOTTEN-MOULTEN 

NEW BERN, N. C. 




PHOTOGRAPHERS 

FOR 

FASSIFERN 



J. S. COLEMAN 

LUMBER 

COMPANY 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



HARDWOOD AND 
POPLAR LUMBER 

'Hardwood Floors an 
Investment 



HOME 
ELECTRIC CO. 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



Telephone 1 1 
Next to Public Library 



What a perfect hostess is the woman 
who makes electricity her servant. 
You can do as well. Come and see 
our electrical appliances. 



The Finest Food Products in the 
World 

Fruits — Right off the trees 

Vegetables — Fresh from the farm 

Fish — Wriggling from the water 

Meats, Cereals, Olives, Condiments, 
all carefully selected and packed 
under this 

One Reliable Brand 

For Sale by 
All Leading Grocers 

R. C. Williams 

New York, N. Y. 



Hendersonville Dry 
Cleaning Establishment 

We Dye For You to Live 

We Clean Everything But Guilty 

Consciences 

Deli er Everything But the Dirt 



DRY CLEAN 

PRESS 

REPAIR 



ING 



Main Street 



Phone 110 



To All Editors 

Desiring Willing, Cheerful, and 
Excellent Aid in Producing their 
Annuals, "The Sapphire" Staff 
Most Heartily Recommends 

Miss Marion Wadsworth 

Typist 

Miss Nora Seaver 

Advertisement Writer 



Hendersonville 


Real 


Estate 


Company 




Phone 




"The Live 


Wire Ag 


ency" 


S. MAXWELL 


A. 


R. HANSON 


P. L. WRIGHT 





Tne Yadkin Valley Mill 
&? Lumber Co. 

Manufacturers of 

BOXES AND SHOOKS 

RONDA, N. C. 



Raleigh's 


Newest Store for Women 






Phone 112 


c. 


c. 


GUNN & CO. 




122 


Fayetteville Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 


B 


:tter 


Quality Garments for 
'omen and Misses 



S. J. HARRIS 

Staple and Fancy Groceries 

Candies and Fruits 

All Good Things to Eat 

Everything Fresh and Clean 

Prompt Delivery 

North Main Street Phone 3 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

A. H. BIRDSEY 

Savannah, Ga. 



SMITH'S BAKERY 


Phone 323 


Fresh Home-Made Bread, Cakes, 


and Pastry Every Day 


PROMPT DELIVERY 


Hendersonville, N. C. 


"Fassifern Cirls Welcomed" 



J. B. BROOKSHIRE 

Livery, Feed and 

Sales Stable 



Saddle Horses a Specialty 



Hendersonville, N. C. 



Compliments of 


Mr. an 


dMrs. 


Floyd A. 


Jackson 


Hendersonville, N. C. 



m^ 



EWBANK ti 
EWBANK 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



The oldest firm in the real estate 
and insurance business in Hender- 
sonville, N. C. Farm, pasture, tim- 
ber and mineral lands, city and sub- 
urban property for sale. Hotels, 
boarding houses and private resi- 
dences for rent. Representing the 
oldest and strongest insurance com- 
panies in the world. If what you 
are looking for is here we have it. 
We believe what you are looking for 
is here. 



We 
wear 
women 


cater especially to the Foot- 
Demands of young college 


Our 
cipally 
terials. 


immense stock consists prin- 
of the latest styles and ma- 


Our expenenced fitters assure 
satisfaction. 




Clements fe? 




Chambers 




47 Patton Avenue 




ASHEVILLE, N. C. 


"Where Particular People Shop" 



B. L. Foster, Manager 
Telephone 1 4 1 

Foster S 
Fancy Grocery 

"THE HOME OF GOOD 
THINGS TO EAT" 



Across from the Post Office 



'We Appreciate Fassiferns Fre- 
quent Visits" 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



FOR 

Pure Distilled Water 

ICE 

Clean Forked Lump 
COAL 

Cold Storage 
FOOD 

Dry Heater and Stove 
WOOD 

CALL 
Telephone 86 or 1 32 

Home Ice & Oil 
Company 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



FINE PHOTOGRAPHS 


And Kodak Finishing 


of the Better 


Kind At 




Bakers Art 


Gallery 


Hendersonville, 


N. C. 



Quality 








53 


nice 




Bl 


y 


Hardware 

Telephone 96 


Co 








F 


or a Square 


Deal 








Hendersonville, 


N. 


c. 





Quality Gift Shop 

Frank Johnson, Proprietor 

Jewelry and Diamonds, Watches, Clocks 
and Fancy Goods, Millinery, Needlecraft, 
Souvenirs and Novelties. 

Phone 440 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 


Geo. W. 


Plumly 


Company, Inc. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 



GLAZENER'S SHOE 
STORE 

HIGH GRADE SHOES 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



GLOVER T. ORR 

High Class Livery and 
Auto Service 

5 and 7 Paesenger Aulos for Hire. Saddle 
Horses a Specialty. Open Day and Night 

Phones 260- W and 164 
Hendersonville, N. C. 



CHAS. ROZZELLE 

"The Furniture Man" 

For anything in the Furniture Line con- 
sult us. Music a specialty. Selling, Ex- 
changing, Buying, Storing, Crating, Ship- 
ping. 

Main Street Phone 2 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



SLAYDEN-FAKES 
&CO. 

Wholesale Grocers 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



The 60th Annual 
N. C. State Fair 

Will He Held At 

Raleigh, N. C. 

October 17 to 22 

1921 

Mrs. George W. Vanderbilt 
Biltmore, N. C. 

Joseph Pogue, Secretary 

RaleigS, N. C. 

C. B. Denson, Treasurer 
RalcigS, N. C. 



Quick Service 
All Work Guaranteed 

English Brothers 

Goodyear Shoe 
Repair Shop 

We Make New Shoes Out 
of Your Old Ones 

Opposite Blue Ridge Inn 

Hendersonville, N. C. 

Telephone 1 60 



Hendersonville 
Transfer Co. 

Hendersonville, N. C. 

Telephone 2 1 

Main Street 

HAULS ALL THE 
FASSIFERN TRUNKS 

Quick Service 



Herman D. Potts 

AUTO 
SERVICE 

Telephone 4 

Hendersonville, N. C. 

Open Day and Night 

Across From Patterson's 
Department Store 



F. H. KINCAID 
AND SON 

Staple and Fancy 
Groceries 

Telephone 270 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



"We Appreciate the Support 
of Fassifern" 



For House Furnishings 

Hardware 

Heating Apparatus 

and All Kinds of 

Sporting Goods 

See 

BLAND 
HARDWARE CO. 

Hendersonville, N. C. 
Telephone 7 



Compliments 

of 

A Friend 



See what a jewel it 
holds. You can get 
others like it at 

W. H. Hawkins 
& Son 

Jewelers and 
Optometrists 



^JW///// 





Established 1880 Telephone 103 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



PATTERSONS DEPARTMENT STORE 

Invites You to Call and Inspect Our 

Ready-to-Wear and 
Millinery Departments 

Queen Quality Shoes Our Specialty 

A Special Welcome to Fassifern 
Students and Patrons 



Telephone 1 72 



Hendersonville, N. C. 



Someone asked Mark Twain: "Of all your books, which do you consider 
the best?" To which he promptly replied, "My bank book." 

HOW TO GET ONE 

Earn More, Spend Less, and Deposit the Rest With 

THE CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK 

HENDERSONVILLE, N. C. 

E. W. Ewbank President 

B. Jackson Vice-Presidenl 

C. E. BROOK Vice-President 

W. A. Young Cashier 

E. H. Davis Assistant Cashier 

"FASSIFERNTS BANK" 



ROCKBROOK CAMP FOR GIRLS 

BREVARD, N. C. 

Rockbrook is a large estate on the French Broad River and includes a 
modern farm operated primarily for the benefit of Rockbrook Camp. It 
is a place for girls to spend a delightful summer in a wholesome environ- 
ment of natural beauty and interest. 

Camp equipment includes large hall, built of slone, rustic cabins for 
sleeping quarters, modern plumbing with hot and cold showers, swimming pool, 
tennis courts and athletic fields. Saddle horses and canoes are provided for all. 

Horseback riding and tramping in the mountains, canoeing on the French 
Broad River, swimming and field sports at the camp are some of the thing; 
to do. Singing, theatricals, and handicrafts are also an important part of the 
camp life. 

The cuisine is in charge of an efficient college dietitian, and health 
supervision is by a registered nurse. 

DIRECTOR 

MRS. HENRY N. CARRIER 

BREVARD, N. C. 





J. W. MdNTYRE 


SANITARY 


PLUMBER AND STEAM FITTER 




HENDERSONVILLE, N. C. 


Main Street 


Telephone 159 


Bath Tub 


s, Lead and Iron Pipe, Well Pumps 




Terra Cotta Pipe 


Lavatories, 


Bath Room Trimmings, Flash Lights 


Electric Lights, "Ra-Mey-Lac Paint 




Good Service at a Reasonable Price 



FASSIFERNS FAVORITE STORE 

THE DRUG STORE OF QUALITY 
AND SERVICE 

HUNTERS PHARMACY, Inc. 

"Everything in Drugs 



Telephone 403 



HENDERSONVILLE, N. C. 




LANCASTER 
DEPARTMENT STORES 

LANCASTER, S. C. 

Outfitters for the college girl who desires Style, 
Quality, and up-to-date Apparel for all occasions 



THE BEST PLACE TO SHOP AFTER ALL" 



Joseph Lee, Pres. 
Landium, S. C. 



H. L. Bomar, Vice-Pres. 
Spartanburg, S. C. 



J. O. Bell, Sec.-Treas. 
Tuxedo, N. C. 



LAKE SUMMIT COMPANY 



TUXEDO, NORTH CAROLINA 




Lots are now on sale on Lake Summit, the largest lake in the mountains 
of Western North Carolina, with an altitude of 2,500 feet, located on the 
main line of the Spartanburg and Asheville Division of the Southern Railway, 
and easily accessible by rail, auto, telegraph and telephone. 

These lots are on the crest of the Blue Ridge and overlook Lake Summit 
with its fourteen miles of shore line and twenty miles of graded driveways. 
With the purchase of each lot is given driving, hunting, boating, bathing and 
fishing privileges. 

Buy a lot on Lake Summit and enjoy the great out-of-doors in the land 
of the Sky, and at the same time be in touch with your business and the 
outside world. 

For Full Particulars Address 

LAKE SUMMIT COMPANY 



TUXEDO, NORTH CAROLINA 



CHAS. E. 
HENDERSON 

52 Patton Avenue 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 

Necklaces, Beads, Bar Pins, 

Watches, Jelvelry 

REPAIRING 

A SPECIALTY 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Evelyn Byrd Graham 

A Farewell to the 
WAW SENIORS 
"Lest We Forget" 



THE WAVERLY 

An exclusive boarding house. Home com- 
forts, hot water heat, electric lights, hot 
and cold water, e'x. Open throughout the 
year. No tubercular patients taken. Rates 
$15 and up per week. For further infor- 
mation write 

Mrs. Bessie A. Edgerton 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



MONTGOMERY & 
CRAWFORD 

Hardware, Mill Supplies, and 
Machinery 

Spartanburg, S. C. 



Compliments of 
Dr. Erskin Ehringhaus 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



Camp Minnehaha 
Home Care Camp Fun 

Bat Cave, N. C. 

MRS. BELLE ABBOTT ROXBY 

330 Fifth Avenue 

Hendersonville, N. C. 

Summer Address, Camp Minnehaha, 
Bat Cave, N. C. 



VISIT THE 

Martha Washington 
Candy Shop 

414 Haywood St. 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 
Celebrated Butter Creams (Jets) , 
Bon Bons, and Caramels; Unique 
Favors, Mottoes, and Novelty 
Decorations for Luncheons and 
Dinner Parties. 



HINE'S 

SHOES AND HOSIERY 

Reflect Elegance and 
Refinement 

ITTTVTC'q WINSTON-SALEM 



Allen &? Clements 

Reliable 
Feed Dealers 

CARRY 

All kinds of Horse Feed 
All kinds of Cow Feed 
All kinds of Hog Feed 
All kinds of Chicken Feed 

FLOUR and CORN MEAL 
Phone 205 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



Your Girls Education 

The future of your girl depends 
very largely on the school you select 
for her. Fassifern offers unusual 
opportunities for the fitting of your 
girl to take her place in life. We 
therefore are careful in the selecting 
of our pictures, offering only those 
that are best. 




THE QUEEN 

THEATRE 



Get It At The 

Ideal Fruit and 
Candy Store 

It Is Pure, Fresh, and 
Strictly Sanitary 

Exclusive Agency for 

WHITMAN'S CANDIES 

Opposite Post Office 
Phone 37 

FASSIFERN'S FAVORITE 
CANDY STORE 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



PARK HILL INN 

Hendersonville s 

Beautiful 

Tourist Hotel 

Park Hill's fifty-acre farm daily 
supplies the inn with fresh vege- 
tables, fruits, chickens, eggs, and 
pure milk and cream from Jersey 
and Guernsey cows. 

Rates on Application 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



Compliments 

of 

A Friend 



WeB 



dSell 



uy an 



We Buy and Sell High Class 
Stocks and Bonds 



TRUST DEPARTMENT 

Southern Life ana 
Trust Company 

Greensboro, N. C. 



A. M. Scales 
General Counsel and Manager 



Herff- Jones Co. 


Official Jewelers 


to 


Fassifern School 


Class Pins Class Rings 


Commencement Invitations and 


Calling Cards 


Indianapolis, Indiana 



Building Material 

Purchased from us carries a guarantee 
of being exactly as we represent it. 

If you want the BEST we have it, or if 
you desire something cheaper we have that 
also. 

With the exception of Plumbing and 
Hardware we can furnish all material nec- 
essary for the erection of a building, in- 
cluding a Heating Plant. 

By April 1 , we expect to be able to do 
all kinds of shop work. 

If interested write, or phone 97. 

Rigby-Morrow Co. 

Hendersonville, N. C. 

301 East Seventh Ave. 

Foster Bennet Roy C. Ben net 

Owners and Managers 



Burckmyer 


Bros. 


Groceries 




Phones 1 8 and 1 9 




Hendersonville 


N. 


C. 



HENDERSONVILLE 
PLUMBING CO. 

A. A. McCall 

Phones 1 09 and 639 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



E. 


LEWIS & SON 




Department Store 


Lac 


ies' and Gents' Outfitters 




Telephone 1 79- J 


Warner's Corsets a Specialty 




Hendersonville, N. C. 



Goode s 


Drug 


Store 




ASHEVILLE, 


N. 


c. 




The 


Cleanest 


Drug 


Store in 


the 






World 









CRUISE'S SHOP 

Manicuring, Shampooing, Hair 
Dressing 

Telephones 16-2497 
23 Haywood Street 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



This Space Donated By 

ALLISON'S 
FLOWER SHOP 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



Sanitary 



Modern Equipment 



Royal Restaurant 

MAIN STREET 

HENDERSONVILLE, N. C. 
The Newest and Best 

First-Class Ser. ice 
For Ladies and Gentlemen 



Brown & West 
Bagging and Tie Co. 

Reworked Bagging 
and Ties 

Belton, S. C. 



THE TUSTUS 
PHARMACY 

W. H. JUSTUS 

Tne Old Reliable 
Drug Store 

Established 1882 

Phones 16 and 1 77 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



Hendersonville 
Hardware Co. 

Telephone 1 00 

risking Tackle and 
Sporting Goods 

Hendersonville, N. C. 



BUFORDS 
BOOK STORE 

AND 

GIFT SHOP 

\Cifts for All Occasions 

Opposite Queen Theatre 

Hendersonville, N. C. 

Bell Phone 99 

Kodak Finishing and Supplies 

School and Office Supplies 

Artistic Picture Framing 



Southern Supply 
Company 

Wholesale and Retail 

Groceries and 
Feed 

Telephone 1 20 
Hendersonville, N. C. 



Fassifern's Patronage Is 
Appreciated 



THE O. HENRY HOTEL 


GREENSBORO, N. C. 


The O. Henry Hotel was named in honor of William Sidney Porter, 


who was born and lived in Greensboro up to early manhood. It is a 


lasting memorial to the most popular short story writer of his generation. 


It is thoroughly modern and fireproof, with three hundred rooms, each 


with a private bath. 


ASSOCIATE HOTELS 


CLEVELAND HOTEL 


Spartanburg, S. C. 


W. P. Martin, Manager 


ARAGON HOTEL 


Jacksonville, Fla. 


A. D. Arnold, Manager 


NOW BUILDING 


FRANCIS MARION 


Charleston, S. C. 


320 Rooms 


DOLLY MADISON 


High Point, N. C. 


130 Rooms 


EACH WITH BATH 


Wm. F. Dor, President W. H. LoWRY, Manager 





We 


Invite You to Open an Account With 




FIRST BANK AND TRUST 






COMPANY 








HENDERSONVILLE, N. 


C. 


R. 
R. 

J- 
H 
R. 
P. 
J. 


C. Clark . . 




President 


M. Oates 

A. Stepp 

F. Patton 

Allen Rhodes 


Vice-President 



Introducing the Inception of a New Line 

Especially Featuring 

Distinctive Youtkful Frocks 

Embodying Every Characteristic Style Appeal 
Sought by the Fashionable Miss 

Priced to Compel Consideration 




Main Street 



Hendersonville, N. C. 



asiiis 



Ms 







ENSON\ 

PRINTING CO. J 

NASHVILLE, .M. 




Our 1921 Annuals 

Vanderbilt University, University of Alabama, Virginia Military Institute, 
University of South Carolina, Louisiana State University, University of Ken- 
tucky, Marion Institute, The Citadel, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Mercer 
University, Transylvania College, Judson College, North Carolina College for 
Women, Wesleyan College, Gulfport Military Academy, Furman University, 
Sewanee Military Academy, Tennessee College, Greensboro College for 
Women, Converse College, Birmingham-Southern College, Kentucky College 
for Women, Meridian College, Lynchburg College, Central College, Woman's 
College (Due West, S. C), Woman's College (Montgomery, Ala.), George- 
town College, Millsaps College, WofFord College, Martha Washington Col- 
lege, Bessie Tift College, Maryville College, Bellhaven College, Elizabeth 
College, Coker College, Louisiana College, Blue Mountain College, Ouachita 
College, Presbyterian College, Elon College, Mississippi Woman's College, 
Roanoke College, Tusculum College, Anderson College, Henderson-Brown 
College, Winthrop Normal and Industrial College, Westhampton College, 
Hendrix College, Kentucky Wesleyan College, Stonewall Jackson College, 
Hillman College, Porter Military Academy, Chatham Training School, Fas- 
sifern School, Ashland High School, Middlesboro High School, Maryville 
High School, Ramer High School, Dublin High School, Wilmington High 
School, Centenary College. 

"College Annual Headquarters" 




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